Illinois' murder trial of the century

Smith Testimony Sealed Peterson Verdict: Jury

"The hearsay testimony from Stacy was the biggest part of it," jurors told reporters Friday

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Members of jury for the Drew Peterson trial spoke to the press on Friday, two days after delivering a guilty verdict and sending Peterson back to jail. NBC 5 Kim Vatis reports on how the jury came to a unanimous guilty verdict and color coordinating their clothes during the trial.

    When Drew Peterson's seven-man, five-woman jury began deliberations, they said they knew his third wife's death was a homicide.

    Juror Theresa Mathews told reporters Friday they guessed Savio was drowned in a sink or toilet, "and that's how she got the gash in the back of her head."

    Seven jurors voted guilty during their first vote on Wednesday. By the end of the day, they voted 11-to-one guilty and by Thursday afternoon, they had a unanimous decision.

    Holdout Juror Explains Reaching Verdict

    [CHI] Holdout Juror Explains Reaching Verdict
    Ron Supalo says it was the hearsay testimonies by Rev. Neil Schori and attorney Harry Smith that cleared the picture for him.

    Jury foreman Eduardo Saldana said testimony from attorney Harry Smith about a conversation he had with Peterson's fourth wife, Stacy Peterson, tipped the scales. 

    "The hearsay testimony from Stacy was the biggest part of it," Saldana said, noting it was especially revealing when Smith talked about "concealment of a homicide."

    Prosecutor: Peterson "a Coward and a Bully"

    [CHI] Prosecutor: Peterson "a Coward and a Bully"
    Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow said he never doubted his case and now may set his sights on the disappearance of Drew Peterson's fourth wife.

    Rev. Neil Schori's testimony about Stacy describing how Peterson asked her to lie for him also proved noteworthy. Holdout juror Ron Supalo told NBCChicago Thursday he needed to sleep on his decision before casting a guilty vote but agreed Smith and Schori cleared the picture for him.

    "Those two were the big ones, just like everybody else," Supalo said. "I couldn't come up with any reason, in my mind, to not put [Peterson] at the scene beyond a reasonable doubt."

    Jurors recalled Friday that deliberations never got too heated, and -- as has become well-known to trial watchers -- they even bonded over clothing choice.

    "We were bored," Saldana said about their color-coordinated outfits.

    Numerous objections and even a few mistrial declarations sent them out of the courtroom enough times for them to get friendly and chat.

    "We all got along," Mathews said.

    Though they had to ask the judge's permission to wear sports jerseys.