Oprah Winfrey Calls Trayvon Martin Case a "Tragedy" and "Shame"

She says lots has changed, though, since the days of Emmett Till

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    Oprah Winfrey told AJ Calloway: "It is a tragedy and it is a shame that we're sitting here 33 days later and there hasn't been an arrest, or questioning of what actually happened. It's a tragedy and it is a shame and we all know it."

    Oprah Winfrey is the latest high profile personality to weigh in on the controversial Travyon Martin case.

    The talk show host told Extra TV's AJ Calloway that it was "a tragedy" that there has not yet been an arrest in the case.

    "It is a shame and we all know it," she said in the interview set to air Thursday and Friday.

    'Extra' Exclusive: Oprah Winfrey Shares Her Thoughts on the Trayvon Martin Tragedy

    [NY] 'Extra' Exclusive: Oprah Winfrey Shares Her Thoughts on the Trayvon Martin Tragedy
    Oprah Winfrey told AJ Calloway: "It is a tragedy and it is a shame that we're sitting here 33 days later and there hasn't been an arrest, or questioning of what actually happened. It's a tragedy and it is a shame and we all know it."

    She added that she would "love" to talk to George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin Feb. 26.

    Zimmerman, who claims he shot in self defense, has not been arrested for killing the unarmed teen. The Sanford, Fla. police department's handling of the incident and decision not to charge Zimmerman has sparked a national outcry echoed by everyone from rappers to politicians.

    President Obama told reporters last week that the event was a tragedy and that if he had a son, "he would look like Trayvon." Singer Chaka Khan released a music video in his honor and a number of athletes and politicians have been donning hoodies in his remembrance.

    Trayvon was wearing a hoodie the night he was shot—an attire choice that talk show host Geraldo Rivera said was "as responsible for his death as George Zimmerman was." The comment drew instant criticism and Rivera issued an apology, though the hoodie trend has continued. NBA players have worn them during warm-ups and on Wednesday Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush was escorted off the House floor for refusing to remove his hood—a violation of House rules.

    The Martin case has drawn comparisons to the 1955 killing of Emmett Till, a black teenager savagely murdered by two white men in the South. But Oprah, though dismayed over the Martin case, had a more heartening take on the country's progress.

    "I saw some people on Twitter saying nothing has changed, the same thing's going on," she said. "Lots has changed and you know why? Because black people, white people, brown, yellow people all over this country and all over the world are saying the same thing... it's a tragedy and it's a shame and justice needs to be served."

    The complete interview airs on Extra TV Thursday and Friday.