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Walsh Gets A Bailout From A Kansas City Super PAC

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Walsh Gets A Bailout From A Kansas City Super PAC

AP

FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2010 file photo, then-Rep.-elect Joe Walsh, R-Ill., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Chicago Sun-Times reports Thursday, July 28, 2011, that Walsh's ex-wife, Laura Walsh has sued her ex-husband for more than $117,000 in what she says is unpaid child support and interest. Laura Walsh filed the claim in December in their divorce case. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Rep. Joe Walsh, Tea Party, Ill., is getting a bailout from a Super PAC in Kansas City, far outside the 8th Congressional District of Illinois.

The Now or Never Super PAC, which is funded by the conservative Americans for Limited Government, is planning to spend $2.5 million on ads attacking Walsh’s opponent, Tammy Duckworth.

Why does Walsh need so much help?

Because in the last fundraising quarter, Duckworth raised $1.5 million, while Walsh raised only $250,000.

And why did Duckworth raise so much money?

Because on July 1 -- the very first day of that fundraising quarter -- Walsh disparaged Duckworth’s military record, saying, “Now I’m running against a woman who, my God, that’s all she talks about. Our true heroes, it’s the last thing in the world they talk about.”

The remarks, which were published on prominent liberal news sites, nationalize what had been a local congressional race, turned Duckworth into a Democratic hero, and resulted in a flood of sympathy donations. In the first week, Duckworth received $85,000 in online donations, many times the usual figure. Walsh responded by complaining that Duckworth was receiving most of her money from outside the district.

For that, he can blame himself. But she sure didn’t raise $2.5 million.

 

This month, Ward Room blogger Edward McClelland’s Young Mr. Obama: Chicago and the Making of a Black President will be available on Kindle for $9.99. Tracing Obama’s career in Chicago from his arrival as a community organizer to his election to the U.S. Senate, Young Mr. Obama tells the story of how a callow, presumptuous young man became a master politician, and of why only Chicago could have produced our first black president.

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