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McCartney Plays Wrigley With a Little Help From His Friends in City Council

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Paul McCartney show at Wrigley Field needed City Council approval because current rules state field can only be used 30 nights a year.

    City Council got down to business today approving one of the most pressing measures the city has seen in decades: Paul McCartney can officially play Wrigley Field at the end of this month.

    Just weeks away from the performer’s scheduled concerts in Chicago, the City Council approved a relaxation of rules limiting Wrigley to just 30 nighttime events per year.

    During Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s third council meeting, the members gave the official word that the concerts could continue as planned for July 31 and August 1. In addition to approving the field for use, the council also allowed for rooftop venues to be open during the events.

    In early June, Alderman Thomas Tunney submitted ordinances to allow the field to be used for the concerts, though at the time no performer had been officially announced to fill the scheduled opening. At the time, McCartney was believed to be in talks with the Cubs and days later the announcement was official.

    McCartney is also scheduled to play Yankee Stadium this summer.

    Wrigley Field has become the go to venue for summer concerts in recent years. The field has attracted performers with mass appeal since it began hosting concerts in 2005.

    The first concert to rock the home of the Chicago Cubs was the master of Margaritaville, Jimmy Buffet. After a year-long hiatus from musical performances, the field played host to The Police in 2007.

    In 2009 they welcomed the joint tour of Elton John and Billy Joel to the Windy City and even saved time for Rascall Flats to play during the same summer. After Elton John and Billy Joel canceled their tour last summer,which would have brought them back to Wrigley, Dave Matthews Band closed out their own tour at the same venue.

    Wrigley Field is presumably very pleased that the council approved, as was expected, because it’d be quite the hassle to refund the tickets, which sold out immediately for both nights.