High Stakes for German Government as Key State Votes - NBC Chicago

High Stakes for German Government as Key State Votes

A disastrous result for either of the ruling parties could further destabilize the national government and ultimately the position of Merkel, Germany's leader

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    High Stakes for German Government as Key State Votes
    Getty Images, File
    In this file photo, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is seen on Nov. 21, 2017, in Berlin, Germany.

    Germany's central region of Hesse was voting Sunday in a state election marked by discontent with infighting in the national government — and its results could help determine whether Chancellor Angela Merkel's administration has a long-term future.

    The election for the state legislature in Hesse, which includes Germany's financial center of Frankfurt, comes as support for the country's governing parties is sliding and tensions are high in a federal coalition that has been in office only since March.

    Merkel's conservative Christian Democratic Union is defending its 19-year hold on Hesse, previously a stronghold of the center-left Social Democrats, the chancellor's federal coalition partners in Berlin. A disastrous result for either or both parties could further destabilize the national government and ultimately the position of Merkel, Germany's leader for the past 13 years.

    Two weeks ago, two of the federal governing parties — the Christian Social Union, the Bavaria-only sister to Merkel's CDU, and the Social Democrats — were battered in a state election in neighboring Bavaria.

    A Timeline of Mueller’s Russia Investigation

    [NATL] A Timeline of Mueller’s Russia Investigation

    On May 17, 2017, former FBI Director Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel to oversee the investigation into possible links between Russia and the Trump campaign. He secured the conviction of one Trump associate, guilty pleas from several others and the indictment of Russians who allegedly interfered in the 2016 election.

    (Published Friday, March 22, 2019)

    That has given extra significance to the election in Hessen, which is home to 6.2 million of Germany's 82 million people.

    Hesse's conservative governor, Volker Bouffier, complains that "the election campaign has been completely overshadowed by Berlin." Social Democrat challenger Thorsten Schaefer-Guembel says "we are experiencing a crisis of confidence — that has a lot to do with the fact that too much waffling is going on and too little being done."

    Voters appear generally satisfied with Bouffier's government, the first coalition between the CDU and the traditionally left-leaning Greens to last a full parliamentary term, and an unexpectedly harmonious alliance.

    But only the Greens, who are in opposition nationally, are benefiting in polls.

    Recent surveys have shown support of up to 28 percent for the CDU and up to 21 percent for the Social Democrats, down from 38.3 and 30.7 percent respectively in a 2013 vote. They show the Greens as high as 22 percent, up from 11.1 percent five years ago.

    Gains are likely for other smaller parties, and the far-right, anti-migration Alternative for Germany party appears set to enter the last of Germany's 16 state legislatures with support of up to 13 percent. The party entered the national parliament last year and, along with the Greens, has benefited from the federal government's disarray.

    Special Counsel Mueller Wraps Up Russia Probe

    [NATL] Special Counsel Mueller Wraps Up Russia Probe

    Special counsel Robert Mueller has finished his investigation into Russian election meddling, officials said Friday. Attorney General William Barr will soon report to Congress on Mueller's findings

    (Published Friday, March 22, 2019)

    Such results would make various regional coalitions possible, with the Greens potentially joining parties to their right or left or even, if their results are exceptionally good, having a chance to make their local leader Tarek Al-Wazir — currently Bouffier's deputy — the state governor.

    Observers believe Bouffier losing power or a disastrous result for Schaefer-Guembel would further destabilize Merkel's federal coalition. The two men are deputy national leaders of their parties.

    A loss for Bouffier would make life more difficult for Merkel, who has indicated that she plans to seek another two-year term as CDU leader at a congress in December. The government's frailty has weakened her.

    The Social Democrats only reluctantly entered Merkel's national government in March, and many are dismayed by what has happened since. A very poor performance in Hesse could embolden critics to push for the Social Democrats to leave the federal coalition, and endanger the job of party leader Andrea Nahles.

    The government has been through two major crises, first over whether to turn back small numbers of migrants at the German-Austrian border and then over what to do with the head of Germany's domestic intelligence service after he was accused of downplaying far-right violence against migrants. It has failed to convince voters that it's achieving much on other matters.

    "If this government were to break apart now, it would come down to early elections," CDU general secretary Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer said this week.

    Trump Escalates Criticism Against Sen. McCain, 7 Months After His Death

    [NATL] Trump Escalates Criticism Against Sen. McCain, 7 Months After His Death

    President Donald Trump again lashed out against the late Arizona senator saying, “’I was never a fan of John McCain and I never will be.” The comments came after he tweeted more scorn over the weekend. McCain’s daughter Meghan said that Trump had a “pathetic life” and “will never be a great man.”

    (Published Tuesday, March 19, 2019)

    She argued that the three governing parties should instead, after the Hesse vote, prioritize a few policies and implement them as "an important signal" to Germans of the government's effectiveness.