PTSD Link Found in NIU Students after Shootings

Symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder were common in DeKalb campus students with certain genes

Tuesday, Sep 6, 2011  |  Updated 8:08 AM CDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
NIU shootings: One Year Later

Getty Images

advertisement
Photos and Videos

NIU: Forward Together Forward

The Northern Illinois University community is moving foward without forgetting the events of Feb. 14, 2008.

NIU shootings: One Year Later

The families of NIU shooting victims share their memories and heartbreak. Alex Perez visits with the Garcia and the Mace family one year later.
More Photos and Videos

A study of college students' reactions to the shootings at Northern Illinois University gives fresh insight into how genes may influence the psychological impact of traumatic events.

Researchers have found that symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder were more common in DeKalb campus students who had certain variations in a gene that regulates levels of serotonin.

Researchers say the results could someday lead to new treatments for PTSD, and also could help predict who will develop the condition.

The research was unique because it involved 204 undergraduate women who by coincidence were taking part in a campus study that measured stress before the 2008 shootings — so before-and-after information was available.

Five students were killed and more than a dozen wounded when a gunman opened fire in a lecture hall.

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
What's New
Get Our Weather App
Stay ahead of the storm with the NBC 5... Read more
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out