Occupy Chicago-Fueled Marches Continue

About 19 protesters were arrested for minor offenses, according to News Affairs

By Lisa Balde and Glenn Marshall
|  Thursday, Oct 13, 2011  |  Updated 10:41 AM CDT
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The Occupy movement joined up with local workers, community groups and unions Tuesday for a second day of merged marches, dubbed Take Back <a title=Chicago." />

The Occupy movement joined up with local workers, community groups and unions Tuesday for a second day of merged marches, dubbed Take Back Chicago.

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Occupy Chicago, Unions Team Up

Chicago anti-Wall Street protesters marched with labor unions Monday in a joint effort to demand jobs for the masses.
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Occupy Chicago joined local unions and community groups Tuesday for another merged protest coinciding with the Mortgage Bankers Association of America conference.

On Monday, protesters from at least 20 organizations marched to show their dissatisfaction with the economy. They rallied outside the Art Institute to call for better education, more job creation and an end to what they called corporate greed.

One person was arrested Monday, but for the most part Chicago police called the protest peaceful.

On Tuesday, about 19 were arrested for minor offenses, according to News Affairs. One group, Action Now, said five of their members were arrested in front of Bank of America. They apparently were arrested after walking into the building.

Occupy Chicago protesters met at 9:45 a.m. Tuesday for Day 18 of their stand at LaSalle and Jackson in front of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

“It’s no longer a country for the people by the people," said Seth Voorhees of Occupy Chicago. "It’s now a country brought by the corporations, and we want it back.”

From there they met in Pioneer Court with dozens of local workers and some families to protest unfair foreclosures. About 100 people protested in front of Bank of America, including about 50 with Action Now and others from Stand up Chicago.

"We're out here because of corporate greed, no jobs, foreclosed homes," said Ed Timmons, a Chicago native who protested Monday as well. "We're out here because we are the 99 percent and the 1 percent needs to give back."

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