Naperville Students: Cheating Rampant at High School

Several students caught cheating using "Bring Your Own Device" program

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    NEWSLETTERS

    While Naperville Central High School leaders continue to investigate increased cases of cheating, some students say it's widespread.

    While Naperville Central High School leaders continue to investigate increased cases of cheating, some students say it's widespread.

    The cheating occurred through the "Bring Your Own Device" program, a pilot program that allows the use of cell phones and other electronic devices in the classroom.

    A significant number of academic dishonesty cases were discovered after a student came forward, and some students say up to 20 people may be implicated.

    A student told NBC5 that one of the students involved in the scandal received a perfect ACT, resulting in their picture being removed from a school display case.

    "One of them would take a picture with their cell phone, go out into the bathroom, send the picture to other people who would then transmit it that way and get answers," said the student, who asked not be identified.

    Student Katie Ludwig said she had to re-take a test on Friday because of the cheating, and that teachers are monitoring the classroom much more closely during tests.

    "They take pictures of the test and it's easily sent through cell phones and the kids will pay money for them because they want good grades," Ludwig said. "Another student snitched .. they looked through phones and found pictures of tests."

    District 203 spokeswoman Susan Rice would not give specifics about punishment in the cheating cases. She said the "Bring Your Own Device" program will wrap up this month, at which point it will be reviewed before a decision is made about bringing it back.

    Parents have been notified about the incident and one will be handled on a case by case basis, Rice said.

    Students say they're now forced to leave their book bags and cell phones at the front of the class before any classroom tests.

    "It's kind of surprising that kids we all looked up to as being really smart and trying really hard, that they would stoop to this kind of low," student Courtney Clinkert said.