Ward Room
Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

Chicago Restaurant Posts "No Weapons" Sign

Keefer's against customers packing concealed heat

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chicagoans begin to react after learning details of the new concealed carry bill - - and opinions are mixed. NBC 5's Rob Elgas reports.

    Illinois new conceal carry law has left a lot of residents and businesses wondering how to adjust to a society where more people might be packing heat.

    One of the provisions of the law passed by the legislature Tuesday permits weapons inside business where alcohol is less than 50 percent of their revenue.

    Emanuel Reacts to Conceal Carry Law

    [CHI] Emanuel Reacts to Conceal Carry Law
    Mayor Rahm Emanuel says he's glad Illinois was the last state in the union to adopt a concealed carry law said he hopes lawmakers adopt legislation to allow Chicago to craft its own, stricter ordinances.

    But River North's Keefer's restaurant isn't happy about the new provision, and plans to install "No Weapons" signs on Wednesday.

    "We do not believe that guns should be permitted anywhere where alcohol is being served," owner Glenn Keefer said. "Once we post that sign, once someone comes in the restaurant with a weapon, they've broken the law. It's our responsibility to remove keys from people who have had too much to drink. I certainly don't want to be doing that with someone who might have a gun on them."

    Quinn: Guns in Bars a "Prescription for Violence"

    [CHI] Quinn: Guns in Bars a "Prescription for Violence"
    Gov. Pat Quinn went to Wrigleyville on Friday to urge lawmakers to pass an amended concealed carry bill he sent them earlier in the week.

    The potential of having more people carrying guns -- and increased violence in the city is causing some Chicagoans to reassess their views.

    "I'm usually against guns, and lately what I've seen in the city, I might consider it," Akhar Patel said.

    "Sometimes people are very explosive, and if they're quote unquote packing, I wouldn't want to be in their company," Sharon Norwood said.

    Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart says there definitely will be more guns on the street.

    "The magnitude of this I think is getting lost on people. We have over 350,000 people in Cook County who have FOID cards. Strong possibility that a lot of them -- most of them could be applying for these types of licenses," Dart says.

    The approved version of the bill calls for 16 hours of training, a $150 application fee and a ban at schools, bars, parks and government buildings.