Don King Uses N-Word While Introducing Donald Trump | NBC Chicago
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

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Don King Uses N-Word While Introducing Donald Trump

King supports Trump for president, and was arguing that black people should support Trump because they haven't been able to assimilate with white culture and need the system to change for them to find success

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    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump applauds as he is introduced by boxing promoter Don King prior to speaking at the Pastors Leadership Conference at New Spirit Revival Center, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016, in Cleveland, Ohio.

    Boxing promoter Don King used a racial slur for black people, the N-word, while introducing Donald Trump at a church in Cleveland Wednesday.

    King supports Trump for president, and was arguing that black people should support Trump because they haven't been able to assimilate with white culture and need the system to change for them to find success.

    "If you're rich, you are a rich negro. If you are intelligent, intellectual, you're an intellectual negro. If you are a dancing and sliding and gliding [N-word], I mean negro, you're a dancing and sliding and gliding negro," King said.

    Trump, who was behind King on stage at the gathering of pastors, kept up a big smile through the remark. Vice presidential candidate Mike Pence was also on stage during King's speech.

    King had also called Trump "the only gladiator" who can take on a system that King said is "rigged" and "racist" and "sexist." Holding American and Israeli national flags, he said white women and African-Americans should vote for Trump to topple the established order.

    King has long supported his friend Trump, but the appearance Wednesday marks his highest-profile appearance on the Republican nominee's behalf. King wanted to speak at the Republican National Convention in July, but GOP officials kept him off the stage, in part to avoid a focus on his manslaughter conviction in the 1960s.