What You Don't Know About the Carp Poison

By Andrew Greiner
|  Tuesday, Dec 1, 2009  |  Updated 4:28 PM CDT
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Carp "Basically Living Missiles"

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The invasive Asian carp can grow up to 100 pounds and more than 4 feet long.

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Carp "Basically Living Missiles"

The Director at the Center for Aquatic Conservation at The University of Notre Dame talks lays out why the carp are dangerous to humans and the environment.
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Environmental officials from the state and federal levels are preparing to pour a bunch of poison called Rotenone into the Sanitary and Ship Canal with the hope of killing a crapload of Asian carp.

Surprisingly, some people are concerned with the prospect of poisoning a state water supply. 

So, in order to put your fears to rest – or possibly to inflame them -- we dug up the facts on Rotenone.

Is Rotenone harmful to humans?
If ingested directly, yes. Rotenone is a poison, and if humans ingest it in high enough doses it can lead to vomiting and death if taken orally in high doses. Rotenone is "moderately hazardous," according to the World Health Organization.

Are there long-term effects?

Rotenone has been found to cause symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in rats, according to the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

How long does it stick around?

Rotenone breaks down rapidly in soil and water. It has a halflife of between one and three days, according to the UK publication, Pest News.

Where does it come from?
The poison is derived from the roots of numerous plants prevalent in southeast Asia, according to Wikipedia.

Are other fish going to die from the poison?
Yes. Yes they are.
 

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