Couple Meets, Marries, Opens Chicago Food Truck

Sam Barron and Sarah Weitz own The Fat Shallot, which recently got the city's OK to hit the road

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The Fat Shallot is one of the city's newest mobile eateries, and the duo behind the food truck has a whole lotta love for each other and good eating. Kye Martin reports. (Published Wednesday, May 8, 2013)

    For one Chicago couple, first came love, then came marriage, then came grilling pulled pork on a food truck.

    The Fat Shallot is one of the city's newest mobile eateries, and the duo behind the food truck has a whole lotta love for each other and good eating.

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    Sam Barron and Sarah Weitz went to the same high school and same college, but it wasn't until they bonded over butter that things really started heating up.

    "We discussed the importance of butter," Barron said, "and thought, 'Oh, this could really be something.'"

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    Weitz is a dietician and Barron brings the culinary chops to the relationship thanks to stints in kitchens in New Orleans and at Chicago's Everest and the revamped Pump Room.

    "The idea to be able to work together and be together versus him coming home from his job at 2 in the morning, this way we could be together," Weitz said. "Sam could be creative and cook whatever he wants to and we work for ourselves."

    They were married in June and now they're in business, and their gourmet sandwich truck just got the OK from the city to hit the road. Their menu includes pulled pork, salami and grilled cheese sandwiches, as well as sides such as tarragon slaw and roasted potato salad.

    "Our whole concept is big hearty sandwiches," Barron said.

    "I always get upset with a sandwich if I am still hungry later even if it tasted good," he said.

    The truck's name is a play on one of Chicago's nicknames, The Big Onion, and though the shallot has a more subtle taste and vibe, there is nothing subtle about some of the homemade remoulades served off the truck.