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Mayor Mulls Legal Action to End Strike

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Rahm Emanuel speaks at an appearance at Tarkington School of Excellence on Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012.

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel has been saying for days that Chicago's teacher strike was one of choice; a choice with which he obviously disagrees.

    And on Tuesday, after an appearance at one of the "Chicago First" sites that was open for limited hours, he did not dismiss the possibility of filing for an injunction.

    "The two issues ... that are really the crux here... [principals' right to hire and fire and teacher evaluations] ...  they're not strikable," he said at Tarkington School of Excellence.

    But taking legal action to force teachers back into the classroom would be a risky move that would only delay resolution, warned Kent College of Law professor Martin Malin.

    "He's got large political risks. The union also has large political risks," said Malin. "Injunctions are risky things. They don't end -- one of the risks is that it just aggravates the dispute."

    Asked about a possible injunction, Chicago Teachers Union President Karen Lewis said the mayor doesn't have the legal grounds for it.

    "We have a completely legal work stoppage," she said. "We have followed every rule."

    NBC Chicago has an array of reporters and producers covering the Chicago teacher strike. Check our live blog for continuous coverage and updates throughout the strike.