Ward Room
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Daley Vows New Gun Ordinances

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chicago Mayor Richard Daley discusses the next options the city has to protect its citizens from gun violence following the Supreme Court's ruling. (Published Monday, Jun 28, 2010)

    As expected, Mayor Daley and Chicago's City Council are circling the wagons to defend against an unfavorable decision by the Supreme Court concerning the city's gun ban.

    Daley said the city would have in place a new ordinance aimed at making it difficult to purchase and own a gun in Chicago.  

    "We'll publicly propose a new ordinance very soon," Daley said at an afternoon press conference concerning the gun ban.

    "As a city we must continue to stand up ..and fight for a ban on assault weapons .. as well as a crackdown on gun shops," Daley said. "We are a country of laws not a nation of guns."

    The Supreme Court did not overturn Chicago's gun ban outright, but sent the case challenging it, McDonald vs. the City of Chicago, back to the lower courts for a final decision.

    Once that comes, the city should have new ordinances in place to limit gun ownership. 

    After SCOTUS eliminated the D.C. ban, the city put in place dozens of regulations surrounding handgun ownership. Prospective gun owners in D.C. now are required to take training courses that include spending one hour on a firing range and several hours in a classroom learning about gun safety. They also must pass a 20-question test based on D.C.'s firearm laws.

    Since the ban was lifted in D.C., just over 800 guns have been registered in city. The relatively low total comes as the district passed the slew of new requirements that also include being fingerprinted and taking ballistic tests, which could help police track bullets back to specific guns if needed.

    "We are digesting the 200 pages and will have something tomorrow to stand up to the court's ruling," says Ald. Anthony Beale, chairman of Police and Fire Co. Committee on Chicago's City Council.

    City officials warned against a run on guns.

    "I would urge anyone buying a gun at this time to wait," said Chicago Attorney Mara Georges.

    The city is expected to take steps similar to what D.C. enacted after its gun ban was shot down.