Texas Board Rejects Criticized Mexican-American Textbook | NBC Chicago
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Texas Board Rejects Criticized Mexican-American Textbook

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    Wednesday's 14-0 preliminary move to block the book, titled "Mexican-American Heritage," must still be affirmed by a final vote Friday.

    The Texas Board of Education has unanimously rejected a Mexican-American studies textbook that experts say is rife with factual errors and anti-Hispanic bias.

    Wednesday's 14-0 preliminary move to block the book, titled "Mexican-American Heritage," must still be affirmed by a final vote Friday. It likely dooms a textbook that has long been disputed.

    Two years ago, the Republican-controlled board defeated a proposal to create a full Mexican-American studies course in Texas. Instead, it asked publishers to submit proposed ethnic studies textbooks.

    But only one Mexican-American studies book was offered. Academics and activists then spent months highlighting dozens of inaccuracies and stereotypes, including suggestions that Mexican immigrants were lazy.

    Pig Escapes Slaughterhouse Fate, Sells Original Paintings

    [NATL] Pig Escapes Slaughterhouse Fate, Sells Original Paintings

    A pig who escaped slaughter is now living out her life in a South African sanctuary and painting original works that have sold for up to $2,000.

    "She was really small when I rescued her," said Joanne Lefson, who manages the South African Farm Sanctuary, a haven for rescued farm animals where the pig now lives. "She's very smart and intelligent so I placed a few balls and some paintbrushes and things in her pen, and it wasn't long before I discovered that she really liked the bristles and the paintbrush...She just really took a knack for it."

    Funds from the art sales go towards the sanctuary.

    (Published 52 minutes ago)

    The head of the textbook's publishing company, conservative ex-board member Cynthia Dunbar, says there's no legal basis for its rejection. She says doing so could spark legal action.