Beware: Fake Bears Tickets for Sale

Look for spelling errors and bogus seat numbers

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images
    CHICAGO - NOVEMBER 14: Members of the Chicago Bear defense including (L-R) Lance Briggs #55, D.J.Moore #30, Julius Peppers #90 and Pisa Tinoisamoa #59 celebrate Brigg's interception against the Minnesota Vikings at Soldier Field on November 14, 2010 in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears defeated the Vikings 27-13. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) *** Local Caption *** Lance Briggs;D.J. Moore;Julius Peppers;Pisa Tinoisamoa

    This scam is worst than a red zone interception.

    The Chicago Bears and Chicago Police are warning fans to be on the lookout for bogus game tickets.

    Con artists, who are listing ads on Craigslist and eBay, are duping local and out-of-state fans who want to see their teams play at Soldier Field, the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

    The deals usually happen away from the stadium where unsuspecting buyers hand over their cash for fake tickets, said Chicago Deputy Chief Jim Keating.

    Police suspect a band of scammers are targeting football fans on the web.

    "The guys do not go by names; we're trying to connect the dots with e-mails and websites," Keating said.

    The team also warns fans to watch out for faceless scammers.

    "We want folks to go to Ticketmaster.com or on NFL Ticket Exchange online," said Lee Twarling, Bears ticket operations director. "When you buy on NFL Ticket Exchange, the bar codes are validated ... You can see who is the buyer and seller."

     Here's how to spot fake tickets, according to police.

    * Bogus seat numbers

    * Spelling errors

    * Different pictures of Bears players than real tickets

    *Glossier than legitimate tickets