Prosecution Rests In Kustok Murder Trial

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Her father, Allan Kustok is accused of murdering her mother. While Sarah Kustok appeared ready to testify Thursday, but left the court without that happening. (Published Thursday, Mar 6, 2014)

    The prosecution rested its case Thursday in the trial of an Orland Park man accused of fatally shooting his wife in 2010.

    Allan Kustok, 63, is charged with killing his wife, Anita "Jeanie" Kustok by shooting her in the face with a .357-caliber revolver as she slept in their bed.

    Witness: Evidence Disputes Kustok's Story

    [CHI] Witness: Evidence Disputes Kustok's Story
    Blood spatter expert Rod Englert says there's only one way the defendant could have obtained the blood spatter stains on his clothes and glasses -- by shooting his wife. Charlie Wojciechowski reports. (Published Tuesday, Mar 4, 2014)

    The Kustok's daughter, Sarah, was expected to testify Thursday, but prosecutors did not call her to the stand. She is expected to return at a later date to tell the jury about a series of text messages she exchanged with her father prior to her mother's death.

    Defense lawyers made a motion for a directed verdict, which is typical in these types of cases, but the motion was denied.

    Defense Grills Blood Spatter Expert in Kustok Trial

    [CHI] Defense Grills Blood Spatter Expert in Kustok Trial
    Defense lawyer Laura Morask grilled expert prosecution witness Rod Englert in cross-examination Wednesday. Charlie Wojciechowski reports. (Published Wednesday, Mar 5, 2014)

    Another motion asking for a mistrial was taken under advisement. Defense lawyers contend the prosecution promised in their opening statements to present certain witnesses and video that never materialized.

    The defense will begin its case by presenting its own blood spatter expert, Paul Kish.

    Allan Kustok contends that his wife shot herself, but the prosecution's expert witness, Rod Englert, testified this week that the blood spatter patterns on his clothing and glasses could only have been created by high-velocity impact, such as a gunshot.

    Kish is expected to testify that the analysis done by the Englert did not go far enough. Englert's theory is that the only way Jeanie Kustok could have died was to have been shot by someone standing above her, holding the gun 4-6 inches from her face.

    Kish is also expected to suggest other possibilities such as suicide or an accidental discharge of a gun on the bed.

    The defense has also criticized Englert for not ordering chemical tests of some of the evidence to search for hidden gun shot residue, and for not confirming with DNA tests the clothing Allan Kustok was thought to be wearing at the time of his wife's death.

    In addition, the defense is also expected to call a ballistics expert to the stand.

    The trial should wrap up sometime next week.