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Chicago To Pick Xerox As New Red Light Camera Vendor

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    NEWSLETTERS

    There are nearly 400 cameras around the city. The top five most-ticketed intersections raised more than eight million dollars, and many of them are in some of the city's busiest neighborhoods. Rob Elgas reports. (Published Tuesday, Feb 19, 2013)

    Chicago may give the green light to a new red light camera vendor. 

    City officials have decided to pick Xerox as its new vendor after the company was dropped by Baltimore with the hopes it won't duplicate the problems experienced in that city.

    IG Report Questions Locations of Chicago Red-Light Cameras

    [CHI] IG Report Questions Locations of Chicago Red-Light Cameras
    Chicago Department of Transportation can't substantiate claims that red light cameras were placed at "intersections with the highest angle crash rates in order to increase safety," report states. Mary Ann Ahern reports. (Published Tuesday, May 14, 2013)

    Thousands of Baltimore drivers who weren't speeding reportedly received speeding tickets because of faulty equipment. It resulted in Xerox State & Local Solutions, Inc., losing its contract with Baltimore, but on Tuesday the company was unanimously selected to begin negotiations with Chicago.

    If chosen Xerox would replace the city's current vendor, Redflex.

    Rahm on RedFlex Violations

    [CHI] Rahm on RedFlex Violations
    Mayor Rahm Emanuel removed Redflex Traffic Systems Inc.'s bid for the city's speed camera contract after an Chicago Tribune investigation turned up ethics violations. (Published Wednesday, Oct 17, 2012)

    Redflex is wrapped up in a federal bribery investigation following reports about an improper relationship between company executives and the city official who oversaw the $300 million program.

    The mayor's office said Xerox was favored in part because of its plan to reuse as much of the city-owned Redflex equipment as possible.

    Xerox officials told the Chicago Tribune the problems in Baltimore accounted for less than 1 percent of all the tickets issued there.