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How to Fix a Lack of Communication in Your Office

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Startups and small companies are like families, and those relationships can crumble if they're not properly maintained. And, well, you can't maintain those relationships without communication. All that starts at the top, and according to a survey carried out by Accountemps, 41 percent of CFOs questioned said the No. 1 mistake they see between managers and employees is a lack of communication between staff and management (Six percent didn't know or wouldn't answer, so, God help them when it comes time to pipe up about their needs).

    As the schism between managers and employees widens, it's harder to pin down what would bridge that gap. If a manager thinks they're approachable but they're really not, then it keeps workers at a distance and breeds resentment.

    Accountemps busts out five key things that managers should say to employees on a regular basis:

    1. Here's what's happening.
    2. Do you have what you need?
    3. Thank you.
    4. What challenges are you facing?
    5. How can we improve the company?

    Now, I have worked in places where they said none of these ever, or only said them once or twice without following up on the responses or carrying out on the requests they prompted. Accountemps has more on what these all mean when they're communicated to employees, so check it out and remember you're only as strong as your weakest link.  

    David Wolinsky is a freelance writer and a lifelong Chicagoan. In addition to currently serving as an interviewer-writer for Adult Swim, he's also a columnist for EGM. He was the Chicago city editor for The Onion A.V. Club where he provided in-depth daily coverage of this city's bustling arts/entertainment scene for half a decade. When not playing video games for work he's thinking of dashing out to Chicago Diner, Pizano's, or Yummy Yummy. His first career aspirations were to be a game-show host.