Breonna Taylor

Police Major Who Oversaw Taylor Drug Raid Unit Investigated

The department declined to answer questions about the probe of Burbrink

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A Louisville Police major who oversaw the unit that sent officers to Breonna Taylor's home the night she was fatally shot is the subject of an internal police investigation.

The department’s Professional Standards Unit opened an investigation this week into Maj. Kimberly Burbrink, the commander of the Criminal Interdiction Division, the Courier Journal reported. Burbrink has been placed on administrative reassignment.

The department declined to answer questions about the probe of Burbrink, which was initiated at the request of acting Chief Yvette Gentry.

After months of protests and demands from Breonna Taylor's family for transparency and more information on her death, Kentucky's attorney general has released audio recordings of the grand jury proceedings in the case.

The newspaper reported that the department's investigative file released this month included a report accusing Burbrink of “pressuring” and “cross-examining” investigators who were probing the shooting.

Burbrink was allowed to attend a May video call to update department leaders about the Taylor case, even though investigators “voiced concern” about her presence on the call.

The report said when investigators pointed out “inconsistencies” in Brett Hankison’s statement to investigators after the Taylor shooting, Burbrink “took opposition with investigators and requested investigators to list the inconsistencies."

A Kentucky grand jury has decided not to indict any of the police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor with homicide or manslaughter, but that doesn't mean there can't be additional charges in the future to hold the officers responsible for her death. Attorney Michael Starr Hopkins explains that federal charges could still be possible under a Biden Administration.

Hankison, a former Louisville police detective, was fired in June and faces three counts of wanton endangerment for shooting into Taylor’s neighbor's apartment the night of the narcotics raid. Taylor was fatally shot March 13 by Louisville officers carrying a narcotics warrant based on the suspicion that an ex-boyfriend might have used her apartment to stash drugs or cash. None were found in her home.

Gentry, who took office earlier this month, has said she wants the department's internal probe of the Taylor shooting to include “everything from the beginning, as it relates to the investigation and the warrant itself, through the supervision of it.”

“I think that’s the best way to do it, to tell the story of what happened in this case and what we have learned from it and what we’re going to do going forward,” Gentry said.

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