Ward Room
Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

Mayor Emanuel Crosses First 100 Days

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Mayor outlines priorities and how his administration has addressed them.

    Tuesday marks Mayor Rahm Emanuel's first 100 days in office.

    It's a milestone Emanuel acknowledged Monday with a laundry list of accomplishments and a warning there's still much to be done. 

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    Similar to his administration's 30-day recap, Emanuel stood beside two giant charts of achievements, touting everything from 4,000 new jobs to $75 million in city savings. He called it all a “down payment” for what voters requested when they elected him.

    “I am here to give a report to the public so they know that their mayor will be held accountable to achieving what he pledged,” Emanuel said. “I want to hold my commissioners and cabinet accountable. I want to hold myself accountable to the public.”

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    The public seems to be listening. In an informal social media poll of readers, most told NBCChicago they like what Emanuel has done so far and look forward to more change.

    With a $650 million budget deficit hanging over him, change will be coming, Emanuel said, and stabilizing city finances remains a top priority. He continues to push for a Chicago casino, and Gov. Pat Quinn continues to hold off on a vote.

    But first and foremost on his agenda? Safety and public schools security. “Can a kid go to school thinking about their studies, and not their safety?” Emanuel asked.

    Emanuel declined to give himself a grade after 30 days in office, and 100 days wasn't much different. His list of achievements considerably grew since the 20 completed items announced in June.

    "I'm proud of it," he said of the list back then, "but I ain't resting on it."

    And so it goes two months later.

    "Until every parent can be thinking about building a life in our city and not about whether the next paycheck will go far enough, my job will not be finished,” Emanuel said.