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Chicago Named One of Atlantic Mag's Most Economically Powerful Cities

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    NEWSLETTERS

    There's no sense sugarcoating this, but there's also no sense in doing that anyway, because you've probably noticed: This is the time of year when all your favorite publications dolly out lists, and even The Atlantic isn't immune from this tradition.

    As far as lists go, though, this one's fairly interesting: Chicago snags the No. 4 spot on The Atlantic Cities' list of the world's 25 most economically powerful cities.

    Our town was edged out by Tokyo, New York and London, which ain't bad company to be in.

    Chicago was touted for its economic output ($460 billion), innovation rank (7) and financial center score (678). That's a .915 "Global Economic Power Score" overall, derived from what The Atlantic deems the three key three dimensions of economic power: economic, financial and innovative.

    "Cities and their surrounding metro regions are the real economic engines of our time," the publication points out. "Bringing together talented, ambitious people and the assets they need to succeed, cities propel the innovation and enterprise that spur long-term prosperity."

    And before you start sighing about the Second City being actually the fourth, take solace in this: We're home to the world's "most unusual miniature golf" course, the Par-King! If you haven't heard of it, USA Today named it one of the greatest places to "putt up or shut up." Huzzah, Chicago!
     

    David Wolinsky is a freelance writer and a lifelong Chicagoan. In addition to currently serving as an interviewer-writer for Adult Swim, he's also a columnist for EGM. He was the Chicago city editor for The Onion A.V. Club where he provided in-depth daily coverage of this city's bustling arts/entertainment scene for half a decade. When not playing video games for work he's thinking of dashing out to Chicago Diner, Pizano's, or Yummy Yummy. His first career aspirations were to be a game-show host.