How Does the Fujita Scale Work? - NBC Chicago

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How Does the Fujita Scale Work?

The EF Scale, which became operational in 2007, is a revised version of the original Fujita Scale

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    Heavy Rain & Storms
    emilyflorez / Instagram
    these photos capture the initial rope stage of development to when the #tornado reached its peak as a wedge tornado all in about 1 hour yesterday. #fairdale #rochelle #kirkland #illinois#chicago. continuing damage coverage@nbcchicago #nbcchicago #nbc5

    The Enhanced Fujita Scale is used by weather experts to rank tornadoes based on estimated wind speeds and related damage. 

    The rankings range from EF0 to EF5, which indicates wind speeds over 200 MPH.

    The EF Scale, which became operational in 2007, is a revised version of the original Fujita Scale, and assesses damage based on how modern structures are designed. 

    The original system was developed by Dr. T. Theodore Fujita at the University of Chicago in 1970. According to NOAA, assessors use 28 "indicators" to estimate wind speeds, like damage to homes, barns, and trees. From there, each indicator gets scored based on the degree of damage, or DOD.

    Dissecting the Illinois Tornado

    [CHI] Dissecting the Illinois Tornado
    The extensive damage caused in Fairdale and Rochelle was the result of an EF-4 tornado, the National Weather Service reports. NBC Chicago’s Alicia Roman gives us insight on how the Fujita Scale ranks tornadoes.
    (Published Friday, April 10, 2015)

    The deadly twister that devastated Washington in central Illinois in 2013 was an EF-4 tornado, with peak winds reaching between 170 and 190 mph, officials said at the time. 

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