Olympics by the Numbers

From how much it costs, to the number of people it will affect, these are the numbers behind Chicago's Olympic bid.

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From how much it costs, to the number of people it will affect, these are the numbers behind Chicago's Olympic bid.
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NBCChicago.com
Chicago 2016 says 315,000 job years means ~31,000 jobs over the next ten years. But as a Sun-Times article pointed out, observers aren't sure whether those jobs are long-term or for a single year. Regardless, the Games will surely mean there's work to be had.
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London's budget was $9 billion. Now it's double, and some say it could be four times as much. Chicago's bid budget right now: $3.8 billion.
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Beijing garnered 4.7 billion viewers in 2008, and experts are predicting at least that many in 2016, if not more. Chicago would have a huge opportunity to show its best qualities and boost its tourism. Bonus for the economy: big ad sales.
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Comparatively, Tokyo plans 10 new permanent and seven temporary structures; Rio plans two permanent, six temporary, and seven regardless; and Madrid plans six permanent, two temporary, and two regardless.
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$71 will get you into most of the 31 proposed venues. That's lower than Tokyo ($87) and Madrid ($83), but higher than Rio, at a bargain price of $36.
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The city's expecting federal aid to fix up its public highways -- good thing, because the CTA's ailing, especially after the resignation of chairwoman Carole Brown. The Games would see two lanes of Lake Shore Drive and single lanes of the Kennedy and Stevenson expressways closed.
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Just a wee amount, ey. Organizers would have to burn through a $450 million projected surplus plus 1 billion in insurance payments before tapping the public. A Chicago Tribune study says the plan covers pretty much every conceivable calamity.
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President Obama hasn't confirmed his attendance, but the White House has made a show of showing support. Obama sent an advance team to Copenhagen just in case, and recently sent a letter to select IOC members touting Chicago's case.
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