Snow Slows Usually Sunny Deep South, Moves to East Coast - NBC Chicago
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Snow Slows Usually Sunny Deep South, Moves to East Coast

The snow later moved over to the East Coast, with the first flakes falling in the Chicago, New England, New York, Philadelphia and Washington areas early Saturday

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    Snowfall shrouding much of the Deep South began tapering off early Saturday, but freezing temperatures kept roads slick throughout the region and airplanes grounded at the world's busiest airport.

    Forecasters warned that moisture on the roadways could freeze and cause black ice to form. The National Weather Service said that while snow flurries would end by midday in areas including metro Atlanta, temperatures at or below freezing could cause transparent layers of thin ice to form on bridges and other elevated roadways.

    The frigid temperatures behind a cold front combined with moisture off the Gulf of Mexico to bring unusual wintry weather to parts of the South. Officials at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, which holds the world record for annual number of passengers, said delays and cancellations were expected.

    "Passengers should monitor their airline's media channels for flight info," the airport said via Twitter. Airport spokesman Reese McCranie said more than 400 flights were cancelled Saturday. That's after nearly 1,200 cancellations Friday.

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    Not everyone was anxious to flee, though. Members of a central Florida family found their way to Atlanta specifically to witness the white drifts.

    "It's beautiful," said Tim Moss, while his two sons and wife threw snowballs at each other near a McDonald's parking lot early Saturday. He said the family - including his mother - made a spontaneous decision late Friday to leave 80-degree weather in Florida and drive seven hours to see snow for the first time.

    "A lot of people who live here are staying in," Moss, 46, continued. "They don't want to get out in it. But we want to get out and run around in it."

    The snowstorms knocked out electricity to thousands across the South. More than 334,000 homes and businesses were still without electricity Saturday afternoon in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Southern Pine Electric Co-operative, which had nearly 10,500 customers without power Saturday in south Mississippi, said restoration could take several days.

    Snowfall and icy roads in North Carolina on Friday closed government offices and schools, sent cars sliding off the road and altered the governor's travel plans.

    Forecasters said heavy snow was falling in the mountainous western part of the state with up to 6 inches likely in areas including Asheville. A winter storm warning was in effect through Saturday morning for western counties.

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    Accumulations of 6 inches (15 centimeters) were reported in Mississippi and northern Georgia, while at least 5 inches (13 centimeters) fell in Alabama. Rare snow flurries were spotted in New Orleans. Motorists were urged to stay off the road in Louisiana for fear of ice.

    The weather band also brought a rare snowfall to parts of South Texas.

    "It's the first snow of the season and any time you even mention snow in the South, you're going to get people a little panicky," said David Nadler, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service's office south of Atlanta.

    The snow later moved over toward the East Coast, with the first flakes falling in the Chicago, New England, New York, Philadelphia and Washington areas early Saturday. Snow was expected to continue falling overnight in Boston, which was seeing 5 to 6 inches, and Connecticut, where 3 to 6 inches was expected in some areas.

    A freeze warning was in effect Saturday for parts of northern Florida, southeast Alabama and southwest Georgia. The weather service said freezing temperatures can harm vulnerable plants and animals.

    Highway department officials were monitoring the elevated roadways and bridges that stretch across much of south Louisiana, warning that motorists to stay home if possible. Some highways were shut down Friday, as snow fell in cities and towns that have little experience with it. Truckers were urged to stay off of Interstate 10 in Mississippi.

    Short, squat snowmen — some already melting by Friday afternoon — dotted yards and parks around Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Josh Black, a 30-year-old LSU graduate student, took photos of one tiny snowman outside the State Capitol building near the gravesite of former Louisiana Gov. Huey Long.

    Black, who hails from the Toronto, Canada, area, chuckled about southern Louisiana's reaction to the snow.

    "They canceled school this morning, which is funny to me, for an inch of snow that is going to melt in an hour," he said, smiling. "This is like May or October where I'm from."