Paralympian Amputee Creates Perfect One-Legged Costumes - NBC Chicago
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Paralympian Amputee Creates Perfect One-Legged Costumes

On Thursday, he revealed on Instagram his latest costume, the popular “Winnie the Pooh” character Tigger

    Winter Olympics PyeongChang 2018 Medal Count
    Country
    Total
    1
    Norway
    13121035
    2
    Germany
    137525
    3
    Canada
    97824
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    It’s almost Halloween and you can expect people to throw a costume together last minute. The same can’t be said for Josh Sundquist, who says he is always thinking about what he’ll wear for the spooky holiday.

    Sundquist’s unique costumes have brought him admirers on social media

    The 33-year-old Virginia native, who lost his leg to a rare form of bone cancer when he was 9 years old, said he's been dressing up consistently for Halloween since college. The costumes over the years have included Lumiere from “Beauty and the Beast,” a flamingo, an IHOP sign and a Dairy Queen "Blizzard."

    On Thursday, he revealed on Instagram his latest costume, the popular “Winnie the Pooh” character Tigger, which someone on Reddit suggested he dress up as.

    Take a Peek Inside Tara's and Johnny's Olympic Hotel Wardrobes

    [NATL] Take a Peek Inside Tara's and Johnny's Olympic Hotel Wardrobes

    Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir are known for their style. But being on the road nearly a month for the Olympics means they need to bring a lot of clothing and accessories. We had the chance to take a look around the NBC Olympic analysts' hotel rooms to see just how much they brought with them.

    (Published Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018)

    “That is such a perfect idea,” Sundquist recalled about when the idea was presented to him. “It accurately reflects that I hop a lot. I was pretty sure, I wanted to do Tigger.”

    The motivational speaker, bestselling author and Paralympic athlete — he competed for the U.S. Paralympic Ski Team in 2006 — loves Halloween. Growing up, he lived in a very conservative and religious household and said his family used to turn off the lights in their home so trick-or-treaters wouldn’t bother them.

    Sundquist, who now lives in California, chooses to make fun out of his situation. He said he’s heard from other amputees, who said he’s inspired them. 

    “It gives me an opportunity to dress as something I am not, but to use what I am in a creative and unexpected way.” he said.