Plane Crash in French Alps: By the Numbers - NBC Chicago
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Plane Crash in French Alps: By the Numbers

Among the 150 people feared dead are three Americans, including a northern Virginia woman and her daughter.

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    A Germanwings co-pilot is believed to have deliberately crashed his plane into a mountain in the French Alps on Tuesday, killing 150 people, including a woman and her mother from northern Virginia and an American man reportedly living in Barcelona.

    Germanwings flight 4U 9525 was less than an hour into its route from Barcelona to Dusseldorf when co-pilot Andreas Lubitz, alone in the cockpit, locked the pilot out of the cockpit and crashed it, officials said Thursday. He apparently wanted to “destroy the plane,” a prosecutor said.

    Yvonne Selke, a government contractor, and her daughter Emily, a recent Drexel University graduate, were both killed, their family said. So was Robert Oliver Calvo, a 37-year-old American man reportedly living in Barcelona, his father said.

    The captain of the plane was Patrick Sonderheimer, sources confirmed to NBC News on Saturday.

    RAW: Aerials of Germanwings Crash Site

    [NATL] RAW: Aerials of Germanwings Crash Site
    Aerial footage from France appears to show pieces of wreckage on the rocky mountainsides. The Germanwings Airbus A-320 went down in a remote area of the southern French Alps.
    (Published Tuesday, March 24, 2015)

    Here is a brief look at the crash by the numbers.

    27: The age of Andreas Lubitz, the co-pilot authorities say intentionally crashed the Germanwings plane after locking the pilot out of the cockpit.

    630: Number of flight hours co-pilot Lubitz had logged with Germanwings before the crash.

    1: Number of crew members in the cockpit when the Germanwings jet crashed.

    2: Number of crew members required in the cockpit at all times on United States airlines' flights. When one pilot uses the restroom, a flight attendant takes the pilot's place in the cockpit temporarily. Many international carriers, Lufthansa's Germanwings among them, have no such protocol.

    1: Number of black boxes so far recovered. Investigators have retrieved cockpit voice recordings from it that led them to believe the co-pilot had deliberately crashed the plane.

    150: Number of people aboard the jet — 144 passengers and six crew members, including Lubitz. All are dead.

    3: Number of Americans on board — Yvonne and Emily Selke, and Robert Oliver Calvo.

    2: Number of babies included in the passenger count.

    16: Number of 10th-graders from a German high school who were on the plane, along with their two teachers.

    38,000: The altitude at which the plane was cruising just before it began its descent and crashed.

    8: The number of minutes the plane descended steadily before crashing.

    6,550: The approximate altitude of the Alpine site where the plane crashed, near the town of Digne in the French Alps.

    More than 6,000: The number of hours the plane's captain had logged on the plane.

    24: The age of the plane in years.

    46,700: The number of flights the plane had made before its crash.

    About 58,300: The number of flight hours the aircraft accumulated since it was delivered to Lufthansa in 1991.

    1953: The year an Air France plane crashed near the site of the Germanwings crash, near the town of Barcelonette, killing 49 people.

    50,000: The number of euros Lufthansa will pay, as a preliminary payment, to the relatives of each deceased passenger to help cover immediate costs, a company spokesperson told NBC News. The money will not have to be paid back, Lufthansa said.

    400: Number of French officers mobilized for the plane crash, according to the French National Gendarmerie.