The Scary Truth Behind Halloween Candy

Learn the not-so-fun facts about your favorite holiday treats.

8 photos
1/8
Wikipedia
Candy Corn contains Blue No. 1, a synthetic dye used in soaps, shampoos and cosmetics -- including Listerine; Yellow No. 5, which is another dye commonly found in fortune cookies, DayQuil, and Swiss Rolls; and carnauba wax, which produces that glossy finish in car wax, shoe and furniture polish. Ironically, it's the same coating used in dental floss.
2/8
necn
Tootsie Rolls, one of the best-selling candies in the world, contain beeswax, grape juice, and gelatin -- derived from the collagen inside animals' skin and bones.
3/8
Wikipedia
Whoppers contain palm kernel oil, which is a key ingredient in most soaps; whey solids, a product of curdled milk; and "beetle juice" a confectioner's coating made from insect extract.
4/8
Photobucket
Good & Plenty's pink candies are colored with a red dye called K-Carmine that is produced from the bodies of beetles; gum acacia, a natural gum used in glue and ink; they're coated with carnauba wax, which is used in deodorant.
5/8
Mike & Ikes contain Yellow No. 5, which is found in horseradish, pickles and crayons; citric acid, an ingredient in many household cleaners, is then mixed with Red No. 40, which is a dye banned in many European countries.
6/8
Wikipedia
M&Ms contain dextrin, a sticky substance found in envelope glue; Blue No. 2, which is the same dye used in jeans; and Yellow No. 6, which has been linked to hyperactivity in small children.
7/8
Wikipedia
Bit 'O' Honey is made of dried egg whites, honey, and sodium acetate -- used in the production of synthetic rubber.
8/8
SHUTTERSTOCK
Swedish Fish are made of sugar, corn syrup, and Red No. 40 -- used in tattoo ink and cotton candy.
Contact Us