chicago protests

Chicago Protests: Demonstrators Block Streets, Vote on Officers in CPS Set

Here's the latest from across the city and suburbs

A big decision is set for whether or not Chicago police officers will remain in public schools in the city.

Here's the latest from across the city and suburbs:

Chicago Board of Ed Votes to Continue Police Contract With CPS

The Chicago Board of Education voted Wednesday to continue the public school district's contract with the Chicago Police Department, keeping officers in schools despite protests calling for their removal.

The board rejected a proposal to remove CPD officers from Chicago Public Schools by a 4-3 vote.

At the same time, demonstrators were shutting down streets in Chicago's Loop calling for an end to school resource officers.

Mayor Lori Lightfoot has opposed ending the $33 million dollar contract, which would mean a blanket removal of all officers from schools.

A measure to remove them from schools failed to advance in City Council earlier this month. A group of aldermen introduced the ordinance as protests against police brutality continue across Chicago and around the world following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25.

CPS has said Local School Councils can review whether or not the individual schools want to keep officers in the schools, and that 72 of 93 high schools had officers, opting to retain them for the current academic year.

Officers in schools have received at least 2,354 complaints of misconduct, the ordinance said, alleging the police presence "creates dangerous conditions for students "that have led to the criminalization, mass incarceration, harassment, death, and heinous use of force against Brown and predominantly Black students."

Downtown Chicago Streets Closed Due to Protests

Michigan Avenue and Ida B. Wells were shut down to traffic Wednesday afternoon as demonstrators marched through the city calling for the removal of officers in Chicago Public Schools.

The march comes as the Chicago School Board is set to vote on whether or not to continue the district's contract with the police department.

Live coverage in the player above.

Protests Continue as Demonstrators Call for CPS to Remove CPD Officers From Schools

Marches are expected Wednesday ahead of a vote from the Chicago Board of Education on whether to keep police officers in Chicago Public Schools.

A noon protest is expected to march to CPS headquarters ahead of the board meeting, then rally at Daley Plaza.

A youth-led action group marched around a now-vacant school in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood on Tuesday..

The group of approximately 200 CPS students and supporters marched through the streets, calling for “police-free schools” as part of a growing movement urging city officials to remove school resource officers from buildings.

“As black and brown students, we know the violence that police put onto us,” organizer Alycia Kamil said.

The group of students was not alone. In front of Chicago police headquarters Tuesday, protesters gathered to call for Mayor Lori Lightfoot to pull $500 million from the police budget, and to cancel the $33 million CPD contract for Chicago schools.

“We can march all day long,” community activist Ja’Mal Green said. “Peace will do nothing to reduce violence until we actually move toward the real resources needed to revitalize these communities.”

Vote on Removing Officers From Chicago Public Schools Expected

The Chicago Board of Education was expected to vote Wednesday on whether or not to end the city's public school district's contract with the Chicago Police Department that places officers in schools - as protests continue calling for their removal.

A measure to remove them from schools failed to advance in City Council earlier this month. A group of aldermen introduced the ordinance as protests against police brutality continue across Chicago and around the world following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25.

CPS has said Local School Councils can review whether or not the individual schools want to keep officers in the schools, and that 72 of 93 high schools had officers, opting to retain them for the current academic year.

Officers in schools have received at least 2,354 complaints of misconduct, the ordinance said, alleging the police presence "creates dangerous conditions for students "that have led to the criminalization, mass incarceration, harassment, death, and heinous use of force against Brown and predominantly Black students."

Illinois Courts to Get Diversity and Inclusion Officer

The Illinois Supreme Court is recruiting a chief diversity and inclusion officer for the judicial branch of state government to address racial justice.

The court said Monday the officer will propose practices, procedures and rules for Illinois courts to protect the constitutional rights of the public.

It said the position will work with the Supreme Court and leaders throughout the judicial branch to achieve goals related to diversity, equity and inclusion.

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