Early Voting Up 62 Percent in Chicago, Led By Women - NBC Chicago
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Early Voting Up 62 Percent in Chicago, Led By Women

"Women are leading the way," Chicago Board of Elections spokesman Jim Allen said. "Our vote-by-mail numbers are 59 percent women voters."

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    Early Voting Up 62 Percent in Chicago, Led By Women

    Early voting in Chicago is up 62 percent over the midterm election four years ago, according to election officials, and voting by mail is trending to break new records. NBC 5's Mary Ann Ahern reports.

    (Published Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018)

    Early voting in Chicago is up 62 percent over the midterm election four years ago, according to election officials, and voting by mail is trending to break new records.

    "Women are leading the way," Chicago Board of Elections spokesman Jim Allen said. "Our vote-by-mail numbers are 59 percent women voters."

    Seniors remain the biggest age group of early voters so far, though millennial voters are showing up in bigger numbers. Allen said the amount of voters by mail will likely break the previous record held back during World War II.

    At the top of the ticket is the Illinois governor's race, which has been the most expensive gubernatorial campaign ever, and the nasty tone has not let up.

    Gov. Bruce Rauner on Tuesday released a new ad comparing opponent J.B. Pritzker to former Governor Rod Blagojevich.

    "We've got to get the truth out," Rauner said while campaigning. "There's a very high risk that Pritzker is indicted in the coming months. This is terrible."

    Prtizker called the ad a "desperate" move with days left before the election.

    "This is a desperate governor in the final hours of a terrible campaign and frankly a terrible governorship," Pritzker said. "He's been an utter and complete failure, so what's he doing? He's on the attack more."

    This election has always had a shadow candidate: House Speaker Mike Madigan, and what role he may play should Pritzker win has been a consistent storyline.

    "We'll have to develop a working relationship," Pritzker said. "I've certainly never worked with Mike Madigan. What I can say is that I think what people want across the state is a governor who will actually work with the leaders in Springfield, especially on the priorities for working families."

    "Those two will definitely work together to raise our taxes, to gerrymander our districts," Rauner said, adding, "both of them are like two members of a rats nest."

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