'She Knew She Should Shoot': Officer Didn't Fire On Attacker to Avoid 'Scrutiny,' Top Cop Says - NBC Chicago

'She Knew She Should Shoot': Officer Didn't Fire On Attacker to Avoid 'Scrutiny,' Top Cop Says

The female officer was attacked by a man who was high on PCP, police say

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    'She Knew She Should Shoot': Officer Didn't Fire On Attacker to Avoid 'Scrutiny,' Top Cop Says
    Chicago Police Department
    Parta Huff, 28, was charged with attempted murder of a police officer and aggravated battery to a police officer after three Chicago officers were attacked Wednesday.

    The Chicago Police Department’s top cop says the recent brutal beating of a female police officer highlights how fallout from police-involved shooting controversies can put officers in danger.

    Around 10 a.m. Wednesday, officers in the 15th District were on patrol when they came across a traffic accident near the intersection of South Cicero Avenue and West Roosevelt Road, authorities said.

    The female officer was attacked by a man on the scene, allegedly high on PCP, who repeatedly smashed her head into the pavement. Two other officers were injured while putting the man in custody, officials said.

    Parta Huff, 28, was charged after the incident with attempted murder of a police officer and aggravated battery to a police officer.

    “She knew that she should shoot this guy,” Chicago police Supt. Eddie Johnson said Thursday. “But she chose not to because she didn’t want her family—or the department—to have to go through the scrutiny the next day.”

    The officer whose head was smashed into the pavement lost chunks of hair before falling unconscious and suffered severe concussions, according to the Chicago Tribune. A second officer also suffered severe injuries, including a concussion and a broken right thumb, the newspaper reported.

    Johnson called for a change in the national narrative about police officers.

    On Friday the Chicago Police Department unveiled a new draft policy regarding officers' use of force that focuses on the "sanctity of life."

    Get the latest from NBC Chicago anywhere, anytime

    • Download the NBC Chicago App

      Download the App

      Available for iOS and Android