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Tim Cook says Apple is ‘constantly' evaluating its decision to advertise on Elon Musk's X

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  • Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company is constantly evaluating whether it's appropriate for Apple to continue advertising on Elon Musk's X.
  • Musk has been accused by civil rights groups of amplifying antisemitic content on X, the social media platform formerly known as Twitter.
  • Cook added he views X, formerly known as Twitter, as an "important property" for discourse but that there's aspects that he doesn't agree with.

Apple CEO Tim Cook said the company continues to weigh whether it should keep advertising on the platform X, after its owner Elon Musk has been accused of antisemitism.

"It's something we constantly ask ourselves," Cook said in an interview with CBS' "Sunday Morning" that aired Sunday.

Cook added he views X, formerly known as Twitter, as an "important property" for discourse but that there's aspects that he doesn't agree with, such as promotion of antisemitism on the platform.

"Just point blank, there is no place for it," he said.

Cook's comments come as Musk is slated to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday amid escalating concerns about antisemitism on X. Musk said in a post that the talks will focus on artificial intelligence.

Nonprofit groups and third-party researchers allege that hate speech and offensive content have become more widespread on the platform since Musk took over in October. Musk and X have disputed the allegations.

Earlier this month, Musk threatened to sue the Anti-Defamation League after the civil rights group reported that antisemitic posts on X have increased sharply under Musk's ownership of the company. Musk blamed the ADL for lost advertising revenue, saying sales for the business were down 60%.

Musk recently sued another nonprofit, the Center for Countering Digital Hate, after it published a report in June that claimed X failed to take action against several subscribers of Twitter Blue, now referred to as X Premium, when they posted inflammatory content.

— CNBC's Jonathan Vanian contributed to this report.

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