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Biden seeks nearly $40 billion in funding for Ukraine, disaster relief and border

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  • The White House is seeking $12 billion for ongoing disaster relief, $60 million in wildland firefighter pay to cover pay increases and $3.9 billion to address border and migration issues.
  • Biden's request also seeks over $24 billion in additional funding for Ukraine's slow-moving fight against Russia.
  • In the nearly 18 months since Russian troops poured over Ukrainian borders, the U.S. has unleashed a war chest worth more than $43 billion to bolster Kyiv's arsenal.
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US President Joe Biden speaks on how "Bidenomics" is helping clean energy and manufacturing, at Arcosa Wind Towers in Belen, New Mexico, on August 9, 2023. 

WASHINGTON  The White House unveiled a nearly $40 billion supplemental funding request on Thursday to provide additional aid to Ukraine and respond to natural disasters, including wildland firefighter pay and border management.

The White House is seeking $12 billion for ongoing disaster relief, $60 million in wildland firefighter pay to cover pay increases and $3.9 billion to address border and migration issues.

Biden's request also seeks over $24 billion in additional funding for Ukraine's slow-moving defense against Russian's illegal invasion.

In the nearly 18 months since Russian troops poured over Ukrainian borders, the U.S. has unleashed a war chest worth more than $43 billion to bolster Kyiv's arsenal.

Biden, who faces reelection next year, has committed the lion's share of military aid for Ukraine. In addition to security assistance, the U.S. has committed more than $110 billion in economic and humanitarian aid to Ukraine and funding for NATO allies.

Read more: ‘We will not waver:’ Biden reaffirms U.S. support for Ukraine as Zelenskyy pushes to join NATO

National Security Council spokesman John Kirby told reporters earlier in the week that the White House was confident it will receive "bipartisan" and "bicameral" support when asked about the upcoming funding request.

"For people that might be concerned that the costs financially are getting too high, you know, we would ask them to consider what those costs — not just in treasure but in blood, perhaps even American blood — if Putin subjugates Ukraine and then sets his sights on our NATO allies," Kirby said in a Wednesday teleconference with reporters.

"If we just sit back and let Putin win, if we let him take Ukraine, where does it stop next?"

"We have seen throughout this war solid support from the American people, solid support from the Congress in a bipartisan and a bicameral way, for continuing to support Ukraine, and we're going to stay focused on that," Kirby added.

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