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5 Things to Know Before the Stock Market Opens Tuesday

NYSE

Here are the most important news, trends and analysis that investors need to start their trading day:

1. Dow set to trim gain after drop from record high

Dow futures trimmed gains Tuesday, a day after the 30 stock average declined from record highs. The Dow closed 89 points, or 0.3%, lower Monday, though well off the lows of the session. The Dow logged a record close Friday as 2021 began strong last week despite Wednesday's siege at the Capitol. Investors instead focused on the prospect for additional coronavirus fiscal stimulus now that Democrats control the Senate in addition in the House and the White House after President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Jan. 20.

2. House could move forward with impeachment

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks to reporters a day after supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump occupied the Capitol, during a news conference in Washington, January 7, 2021.
Erin Scott | Reuters
U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks to reporters a day after supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump occupied the Capitol, during a news conference in Washington, January 7, 2021.

In Democratic efforts to oust President Donald Trump for inciting the Capitol riot, the House plans to pass a resolution Tuesday, calling on Vice President Mike Pence and the Cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment. Pence has showed reluctance to remove Trump. If the former fails to act, the House will meet on Wednesday morning to consider impeachment. The full House would need a 218-vote majority to impeach Trump.

Trump is set to travel Tuesday to Alamo, Texas, a city in the Rio Grande Valley near the U.S-Mexican border, to talk about his efforts to crack down on illegal immigration. Since last week's Capitol breach, the outgoing president has been isolated, aggrieved and staring down the prospect of a second impeachment.

3. FBI warns states of armed protests

Pro-Trump supporters and far-right forces flooded Washington DC to protest Trump's election loss, January 6, 2021.
Michael Nigro | Pacific Press | LightRocket | Getty Images
Pro-Trump supporters and far-right forces flooded Washington DC to protest Trump's election loss, January 6, 2021.

As security plans in anticipation of unrest surrounding Biden's inauguration take shape in Washington, the FBI sent a memo warning authorities of possible armed demonstrations in all 50 state capital buildings, starting Saturday.

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf resigned Monday, the third Cabinet-level official to quit in the wake of the Capitol attack by a mob of Trump supporters, who disrupted the confirmation by Congress of Biden's election as the next president.

Two U.S. Capitol officers were suspended and at least 10 others are under scrutiny. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan, who chairs one of the committees that oversees the Capitol Police, said investigators want to know whether any law enforcement members could have facilitated last week's invasion.

4. Disneyland to become a Covid vaccination site

An entrance area to Disneyland stands empty on September 30, 2020 in Anaheim, California.
Mario Tama | Getty Images
An entrance area to Disneyland stands empty on September 30, 2020 in Anaheim, California.

Disneyland in California — the Walt Disney theme park closed since the early days of the pandemic in March — will be used as a site to provide Covid vaccinations. It will be operational this week. California late last month became the first state with more than 2 million confirmed coronavirus cases.

Nearly 9 million Americans had been given their first Covid vaccination dose as of Monday, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, representing less than one-third of the 25 million total doses distributed to states by the U.S. government.

5. Walmart to create fintech start-up

Cars drive past a Walmart store in Washington, DC, on August 18, 2020.
Nicholas Kamm | AFP | Getty Images
Cars drive past a Walmart store in Washington, DC, on August 18, 2020.

Walmart plans to create a financial-technology start-up with Ribbit Capital, one of the venture capital firms behind popular online trading app Robinhood. Walmart said it will develop unique and affordable financial products for its employees and customers. The fintech start-up will be majority-owned by Walmart, and its board will include several company executives, including CFO Brett Biggs and Walmart U.S. CEO John Furner. Walmart also will name independent industry experts to the board and may acquire or partner with other fintech companies.

— NBC News, The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report. Follow all the developments on Wall Street in real time with CNBC Pro's live markets blog. Get the latest on the pandemic with our coronavirus blog.

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