'Days of Our Lives' Cast Let Go From Contracts, as the Show Struggles With Ratings - NBC Chicago

'Days of Our Lives' Cast Let Go From Contracts, as the Show Struggles With Ratings

The entire cast of “Days of Our Lives” has been released from their contracts and the show is set to go on an indefinite hiatus at the end of the month, according to a TVLine report

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    The sands of time may be running out for the “Days of Our Lives.” 

    The entire cast has been released from their contracts and the show is set to go on an indefinite hiatus at the end of the month, according to a TVLine report. 

    NBC has not canceled the soap, TV Line said. It is shot eight months in advance and will run until 2020, the report said. It added, Sony and NBC are still in negotiations to potentially renew the contract. 

    The over 50-year-old soap opera is NBC’s longest running series, but ratings have been declining in recent years. 

    The move comes as NBC is prepping for the upcoming launch of streaming service Peacock in 2020. It’s unknown if “Days” has inked a deal with the company to be available on the platform. It wasn’t mentioned in an initial list of shows

    Earlier this year, Corday Productions, the company behind Days of Our lives, sued Sony Pictures Television for $20 million. It alleged that Sony was prioritizing “Young and Restless” rather than fairly promoting both soaps because it gains more revenue from “Young and Restless.” 

    “Sony Pictures Television has embarked on a concerted campaign to destroy the legendary daytime drama Days of our Lives by starving it to death,” alleges the complaint filed by Corday Productions. 

    NBC and Corday Productions did not respond to comment. Sony Pictures Television declined to comment. 

    Read the full story on TVLine here

    Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC.

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