Emanuel Makes First On-Camera Comments Since Van Dyke Verdict - NBC Chicago
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Emanuel Makes First On-Camera Comments Since Van Dyke Verdict

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Mayor Emanuel Speaks Out For First Time After Van Dyke Verdict

    In his first public comments since the conviction of Police Officer Jason Van Dyke, Mayor Emanuel speaks out and reacts to new comments from President Donald Trump, who says Attorney General Jeff Sessions needs to come to Chicago to help the shooting epidemic. NBC 5's Mary Ann Ahern reports.

    (Published Monday, Oct. 8, 2018)

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel said Monday there is more work to be done when it comes to police reform in his first on-camera comments on Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke was found guilty of the 2014 murder of Laquan McDonald last week.

    Emanuel also reacted to new comments from President Donald Trump, who said Attorney General Jeff Sessions needs to come to Chicago to "help straighten out the terrible shooting wave."

    Emanuel noted the changes Chicago police have made since the shooting of McDonald. At the same time when asked if he had regrets about not showing the video sooner — he did not answer that question directly.

    "We followed a policy, we've made fundamental changes now," he said.

    Since McDonald's shooting four years ago — a police superintendent was fired, the Cook County state’s attorney lost her election — and now Emanuel has chosen not to run for re-election.

    Negotiating a new police contract likely won’t happen in Emanuel’s final months in office.

    Trump — speaking at a convention of police officers —said he's directed Sessions to come to Chicago.

    "To try to change the terrible deal the city of Chicago entered into with ACLU which ties law enforcement's hands," the president said. "And to strongly consider stop-and-frisk--it works and it was meant for problems like Chicago."

    Emanuel rejected that proposal.

    "The failed policies he's (Trump) talking about have no place for a city that's working together with communities about how to build, not only trust, but a collaborative and cooperative relationship," Emanuel said.

    While the president often mentions Chicago when referring to violence, there have been 102 fewer homicides and 500 fewer shootings this year compared to last year.

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