Live Blog: Lightfoot Beats Preckwinkle, AP Projects - NBC Chicago
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Live Blog: Lightfoot Beats Preckwinkle, AP Projects

Chicago Board of Elections reports that Precinct 27 in the 39th Ward opened "exceptionally late"

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Election Day in Chicago is here and voters across the city are quickly becoming a part of history.

Voters are casting ballots in the runoff election for a new mayor, a new treasurer and in some cases, for their ward's City Council seat. 

10 Races to Watch in Chicago's Municipal Runoff Elections10 Races to Watch in Chicago's Municipal Runoff Elections

Lori Lightfoot and Toni Preckwinkle advanced to the runoff in February from a field of 14 candidates - the largest number in Chicago history - meaning that for the first time, the city will have a black, female mayor.

You can find live election results as they come in here.

Here's a live look at how Election Day is unfolding across the city:

8:10 p.m.: Melissa Conyears-Ervin defeats Ameya Pawar in race for Chicago city treasurer, AP projects.

7:50 p.m.: BREAKING: Lori Lightfoot to become Chicago's first black female mayor, the AP reports.

7:20 p.m.: With 17 percent of Chicago wards reporting, Lightfoot takes a commanding early lead with 62,840 votes to Preckwinkle's 19,910.

6 p.m.: Turnout stands at 457,517 ballots cast, which is 28.7 percent, with about two hours left before polls close. 

3 p.m.: 370,513 ballots have been cast so far, according to the Chicago Board of Elections, including early voting and vote by mail ballots. That equates to 23.2 percent turnout. The leading age group is 55-64, with 81,000 ballots cast. Next is 65-74 with 74,000 votes, then 45-54 with about 61,000 votes. Roughly 53,500 voters between the ages of 35 and 44 cast their ballots, and about 42,000 between 25 and 34. 

2 p.m.: Election officials received a call for an incident at Hamilton Park, which is the polling place for Precinct 10 in the 6th Ward, located at 513 W. 72nd St., Board of Elections spokesman Jim Allen said. There was an allegation of an assault by a supporter of Ald. Rod Sawyer's campaign on a campaign worker for his opponent, Deborah Foster-Bonner, according to Allen.

Chicago police said an "unknown offender" struck a 26-year-old male in the face following a verbal altercation. The victim refused medical attention and the offender fled the scene, according to police, who continue to investigate. 

Election officials are still investigating the incident, which had multiple witnesses and was the subject of a video posted to Facebook, he said. Malcolm Bonner, Foster-Bonner's son who works for her campaign, said he was the one who was hit and posted the video on Facebook. He declined to offer comment on behalf of the campaign, saying they were "pending legal proceedings."

Kenny Sawyer, who identified himself as a member of Ald. Sawyer’s family who has been “helping out the campaign,” said, "A member of our campaign staff got into it with a person from her campaign."

"It was a scuffle from what I understand. It's an unfortunate incident, it got a little heated," he added, declining to identify the alleged attacker.

"This is not a staff member. I’m not exactly sure what happened. We’re just getting information ourselves," Kenny Sawyer said.

1:56 p.m.: The Board of Elections dishes out a little sports history with today's politics. 

1:10 p.m.: As of 1 p.m., more than 157,000 voters have cast their ballots, according to election officials.  

11:30 a.m.: Chicago Board of Elections reports that Precinct 27 in the 39th Ward opened "exceptionally late," but noted "it appears that all voters are going to be able to return by close of polls." Officials said the delay was caused by judges not showing up on time. 

11:15 a.m.: Election officials say voting so far on pace with February election, though more millennial voters are out for the runoff. 

As of 11 a.m., totals by age include:

Ages 25-34: 33,000 votes

Ages 35-44: 42,000 votes

Ages 45-54: 47,000 votes

Ages 55-64: 61,500 votes

Ages 65-76: 55,600 votes

Ages 75 and older: 35,500 votes

"It’s clearly a lot easier for people to make up their minds in this round and people are doing so and have been doing so," said Chicago Board of Elections spokesman Jim Allen. "Whether that means there are going to be more people participating remains to be seen." 

The choice is a lot simpler when itโ€™s boiled down to a one-on-one contest.Jim Allen, Chicago Board of Elections spokesman

10:57 a.m.: Toni Preckwinkle casts her ballot in Chicago. 

She told reporters she voted for "moi," then chuckled. Says she’s feeling good, has no regrets about how she campaigned.

"It’s all in the voters' hands now," she said. 

Preckwinkle Casts Her Ballot in Runoff ElectionPreckwinkle Casts Her Ballot in Runoff Election

Mayoral candidate Toni Preckwinkle casts her ballot in the runoff election in Chicago. But who did she vote for? 

(Published Tuesday, April 2, 2019)

9:10 a.m.: Chicago Board of Elections reports voter turnout as of 9 a.m. sits at 65,496. 

8:10 a.m.: Voter turnout as of 8 a.m. sits just over 38,500, Chicago election officials said. 

7:48 am.: Reports of a polling place in Ward 1, Precinct 30 not opening on time. Election officials say they reached out to the location and apologized for the delay. 

7:10 a.m.: Even pets are flocking to Chicago polling places! 

6:47 a.m.: At the 42nd Ward polling place in Chicago's Loop, snacks are offered for voters. 

6:40 a.m.: Voters began casting their ballots in Chicago. At one location in Palmer Square, a small group of voters came out early. Workers, however, say the turnout is much smaller than during the November election, when lines were out the door before 7 a.m. 

6:25 a.m.: Reports that scanners are broken at some polling locations. Votes being placed in ballot boxes until scanners are fixed, voters said. 

6 a.m.: Polls are officially open! If you are casting your ballot on Election Day, you have just one option: your designated polling place. If you don't know where that is click here to find out. 

5 a.m.: Election officials reveal Chicago's early voting numbers for the run-off elections are "statistically comparable" to the February election. The total, however, is lower than in the April 2015 run-off. Meanwhile, vote by Mail returns are ahead of the February totals and the April 2015 runoff totals. 

For a complete guide to the April runoff election click here

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