CPS Classes Resume Tuesday as City Digs Out | NBC Chicago

CPS Classes Resume Tuesday as City Digs Out

Weekend storm buried parts of the city under more than a foot-and-a-half of snow



    How Chicago responded to the record-breaking snow event. Mary Ann Ahern reports. (Published Monday, Feb. 2, 2015)

    Classes will resume Tuesday for Chicago Public Schools students, officials said during a press conference updating the city's response to the weekend storm that buried parts of the city under more than a foot-and-a-half of snow.

    CPS classes were canceled Monday.

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the Super Bowl snow "a snow storm for the record books," but said the city had a "record response as well."

    Officials said they worked for 36 hours straight to make sure the city kept moving.

    Department of Streets and Sanitations Commissioner Charles Williams said the city had more than 350 snow removal vehicles on city roadways Monday, which were expected to drop more than 75,000 tons of salt.

    By 8:30 a.m. Monday morning, vehicles had shifted from the main arterial roads to residential side streets. As of 9 p.m. Monday night, nearly 80 percent of neighborhood streets had been plowed allowing at least one pass, according to Williams.

    Residents can monitor and track plows online at ChicagoShovels.org.

    The final tally for Sunday's snowfall at O'Hare International Airport, where the city's weather conditions are officially recorded, was 16.2 inches. Midway International Airport, on the city's South Side, received even more.

    The storm produced enough snowfall to rank it as the fifth largest snow event in city history, and Sunday was the snowiest February 1 Chicago had ever seen.

    While the system responsible for the deluge had largely moved out of the area by early Monday, a plume of moisture continued to drop an additional inch or two of lake effect snow.

    Your Snowman PhotosYour Snowman Photos

    Commissioner Charles Williams on Sunday reminded landlords and business owners that it is their responsibility to shovel sidewalks, and he encouraged residents to check on elderly or disabled neighbors.

    An Illinois Department of Transportation spokesman said the express lanes of the Kennedy Expressway were closed to both inbound and outbound traffic so crews could clear them of snow. Normal operations were expected for the Monday afternoon commute, spokesman Guy Tridgell said.

    The storm knocked out power to nearly 54,000 ComEd customers. That number had been reduced to about 2,700 2:30 a.m. Monday, according to a post on Twitter. The utility said 200 crews working throughout the night to restore power. That number was to increase to 550 crews during the day.

    Spokespeople for both Metra and the Chicago Transit Authority said the agencies would operate on regular Monday schedules, though commuters were advised to provide extra time.

    "Overall, CTA service went well this morning given the conditions we faced," said CTA President Forrest Claypool.

    Claypool did note that some lines saw longer than normal waits due to the weather, but those delays are not expected for the evening commute.

    A stalled freight train prevented commuters on Metra's Milwaukee District North Line from boarding at the Northbrook platform. Those trying to get into the city were instead told to board at North Glenview station or at Lake-Cook.

    Additionally, the UP lines were reporting 30 minute delays by 5:30 a.m.

    CTA buses that had been rerouted off of Lake Shore Drive on Sunday evening were back on their normal routes as of 5 a.m. Monday, spokeswoman Tammy Chase told NBC Chicago.

    Dogs in the SnowDogs in the Snow

    Amtrak canceled Monday service between Chicago and Quincy.

    Chicago's airports reported more than 1,200 flight cancellations by Monday night. That's in addition to the more than 1,600 flights that were cancelled at O'Hare and Midway on Sunday. Those flights that were getting in and out were averaging delays of 15 to 20 minutes at O'Hare and between 15 and 30 minutes at Midway.

    CPS wasn't the only district to cancel Monday classes. Suburban district schools closed Monday include those in Joliet Public School District 86; Plainfield Community Consolidated School District 202; Oak Lawn-Hometown School District 123; Oak Park Elementary School District 97; Naperville Community Unit School District 203; DuPage County School District 45; Des Plaines School District 62; Schaumburg Township Elementary School District 54; Skokie School District 68; Barrington Community Unit School District 220; and Wilmette Public Schools District 39.

    A full list of Chicago-area school and business closings is available at http://www.nbcchicago.com/weather/school-closings.

    The snowfall hampered garbage collection in Chicago, the suburbs, and in Northwest Indiana. Waste Management, which handles much of the collection, said it would operate on a holiday schedule.

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