High Heat Takes Hold of Chicago

Heat indexes in the 100s are expected to last through the week

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    NEWSLETTERS

    If you think Monday was hot, wait until the middle of the week, meteorologist Ginger Zee says. (Published Wednesday, Sep 14, 2011)

    It's going to get worse before it gets better.

    Dangerous heat digs into Chicago on Monday, prompting a heat advisory in the metro area for most of the day and warnings in the city and suburbs to stay hydrated and limit activities.

    Monday highs of 90-95 yield heat indexes of 100 to a whopping 110 in some spots. A few thunderstorms could be possible overnight Monday and early Tuesday morning, as well as a slight risk for strong to severe storms.

    Chicagoans, especially those who have to work outside, were struggling to adjust. Nathan Alexander was part of a moving crew on a job near the University of Chicago.

    "It's excruciating, man. It can get to you sometimes. Just your legs and your back. Just gotta keep moving," Alexander said.

    The city's Office of Emergency Management reminds residents to seek air conditioning and drink plenty of liquids. Cooling center have been set up throughout the area.

    Find the closest cooling center near you.

    The high heat won't let up anytime soon. Tuesday temperatures likely will dip slightly to the lower 90s, but humidity persists with a chance of showers and thunderstorms. Scorching highs soar again Wednesday, with mid-90s producing heat indexes between 100 and 105.

    Thursday is on track to be the hottest day of the week -- and the year so far. Prepare for blazing heat of upper 90s that feel like 105-110. On Thursday especially the OEMC urges residents to check on the elderly and never leave pets outdoors or unattended in cars.

    Over the weekend Cubs fans attending the game at Wrigley Field were given free water, and misting machines were on site. Water was given free at Pitchfork Music Festival, as well, where CTA cooling buses were parked for concert-goers to feel a brief reprieve.