Some Chicago Cabbies to Strike Monday

Chicago taxi drivers plan to strike during rush hour every Monday until the city approves a fare increase

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chicagoans may have trouble flagging down taxi drivers on Mondays.

    Some cab drivers plan to strike during morning rush hour every Monday until the city permits a fare increase, according to the Chicago Tribune.

    Despite the fact that taxi drivers are individually contracted workers and not part of a union, the United Taxi Drivers Community Council said Wednesday it hopes a substantial amount of the city’s nearly 12,000 taxi drivers will join in to voice their frustrations.

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    The strike comes as regulations set to begin July 1 will drive up the cost of leasing the bright yellow vehicles by 30 percent and limit drivers to a 12-hour work day.

    The mayor's office said in a statement the new guidelines "will result in safer drivers, cleaner cabs and better options for patrons."

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    "Until those reforms are fully implemented, it is premature to talk about charging more for a ride."

    Though the City Council approved a permanent $1 surcharge for fuel, the United Taxi Drivers Community Council said many taxi drivers are still facing bare-minimum wages and are forced to work 13- to 14-hour workdays, according to a study done by the University of Chicago.

    The new regulations honor some cabbie’s concerns, such as posting a $50 fee for vomiting riders, but the drivers say the surcharge does not account for increasing gas prices and the lease increase will cost even more money, the Tribune reports.