Cubs Shirts Were Right Idea Gone Wrong

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    Starlin Castro #13 of the Chicago Cubs (L) hugs teammate Tony Campana #41 after getting the game-winning hit, driving in Campana, against the Milwaukee Brewers at Wrigley Field on Tuesday.

    The Chicago Cubs wore t-shirts before Tuesday's games that said what every right-minded Cubs fan has thought for years.

    A day later, they promised those shirts won't be worn on the field again, which is the right call. Since they won't appear again, let's admit that the shirts were the right idea shared in the wrong way.

    The message delivery? Not good. Vulgarities have their place in the clubhouse and are often welcomed in the bleachers, but shouldn't be on the backs of players while on Wrigley Field.

    The Bears and NFL are rightly concerned that a picture of Major Wright in uniform appeared on an ad for an adult entertainment expo. The Cubs and MLB should be just as concerned when the mother of all swear words shows up on players backs.

    But the sentiment? It's dead-on.

    To erase more than a century of bad luck, mismanagement and bad play -- not to mention a partial season of injuries and losses -- the Cubs have to band together and tell that curse where to go.

    They have to say that something as silly as "The Curse of the Billy Goat" has no place among professional athletes, and that their ability to play the game together will transcend any bad ju-ju that may have happened decades ago.

    Their unity showed in the past two games, as they beat the Brewers in close games; close games that they would have lost a week ago.

    So try to not to get too angry about the shirts that had the right idea, but was shared the wrong way.

    *Maggie Hendricks is a Chicago-based sports writer who spends most of her time writing witty, informative posts for NBCChicago's Bears blog Grizzly Detail. She's taken her talents to basketball while the Bears hibernate.