2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

2012 Elections: News, Analysis, Videos, and Breaking on the Presidential Election, Local Elections, and More

Complete coverage of the 2012 election

Santorum, Romney Make Final Illinois Push

Romney spoke at the University of Chicago while Santorum traveled to western Illinois

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    GOP presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney prepare to campaign in Illinois a day before the primary election.

    The two leading contenders in the GOP nomination race to face President Barack Obama made their last push ahead of Tuesday's Illinois primary.

    Mitt Romney woke up in Springfield Monday before heading to the University of Chicago for a noon speech where he attacked the president's economic policies and asked voters to help him take the country in a new direction.

    Romney Speaks of "Economic Freedom"

    [CHI] Romney Speaks of "Economic Freedom"
    Mitt Romney berated the Obama administration in a speech Monday at the University of Chicago, where the president lectured for more than a decade. Speaking to a crowd of about 150 students and faculty members, Romney slammed President Obama's economic policies, calling them "the primary reason why the recovery has been so tepid."

    "Freedom is on the ballot this year,'' Romney told students and supporters at the University of Chicago, contending that the nation's recovery from recession was being limited by an "assault on our economic freedom'' by Obama. "I am offering a real choice and a very different beginning,'' he said.

    Romney called U of C "a place of great significance." President Obama taught law at the Chicago compus for more than a decade.

    One-On-One with Santorum

    [CHI] One-On-One with Santorum
    NBC Chicago's Mary Ann Ahern speaks with Rick Santorum about the election, winning delegates and his Illinois ties.

    Speaking from a podium in front of six American flags, Romney criticized the president for growing the federal government and for, in his view, botching the economic recovery.

    "Over the last several decades, and particularly over the last three years, Washington has consistently encroached upon our freedom. The Obama administration’s assault on our economic freedom is the principal reason why the recovery has been so tepid – why it couldn’t meet their expectations, let alone ours," Romney said. "If we don’t change course now, the assault on freedom could damage our economy and the well-being of American families for decades to come."

    At the same time, GOP contender Rick Santorum struggled to explain why the nation's unemployment rate is not his top concern and why the economy isn't the issue that defines the race even as he tried to rally anti-Romney conservatives.

    "At every single speech that I give I talk about Obamacare,'' he said to voters in Rockford. "Every single speech I say that the issue in this race is not the economy. The reason the economy is an issue in this race is because we have a government that is oppressing its people and taking away their freedom and the economy is suffering as a result of it.''

    Santorum later explained his comments as being about freedom, not the economy.
     
    "The problem with the economy is government taking people's freedom away and advancing regulations, destroying and undermining businesses ability to be problem solvers,'' he told WLS radio. "Americans don't take kindly to the yoke of government, and we don't do very well. Our economy struggles when that happens."
     
    The pair of candidates are in a fierce battle for Illinois' 54 delegates. Romney has spent big on advertising and will have devoted more than three straight days to the state -- an eternity by some standards in this constantly shifting campaign -- by the time votes are counted Tuesday night.

    After embarrassing Santorum with a one-sided victory in Puerto Rico Sunday, the Romney campaign sees in Illinois a potential breaking point for stubborn rivals who have defiantly vowed to stay in the race until the GOP's national convention in August. Should Santorum and Newt Gingrich stay politically alive until then and follow through on their threat, it could turn the convention into an intra-party fight for the first time since 1976.
     
    Illinois is expected to be far closer than Puerto Rico's blowout, although recent polls suggest Romney may be pulling away. Even if he should lose the popular vote, Romney is poised to win the delegate battle. Santorum cannot win at least 10 of the state's 54 delegates available Tuesday because his campaign didn't file the necessary paperwork
     
    Still, Santorum campaigned hard across the state Sunday and Monday in light of the stakes in Illinois, one of the last premier battlegrounds before the Republican race enters an extended lull after Saturday's contest in Louisiana.

    "If we're able to come out of Illinois with a huge or surprise win, I guarantee you, I guarantee you that we will win this nomination," Santorum said.

    Romney will watch the Illinois returns from the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel. Santorum had planned to be in Elgin but instead opted for an event in Gettysburg, Penn.

    For both of the men, voter turnout will be key. Former Repubican presidential candidate John McCain, who supports Romney, was in Chicago on Monday and stressed how important it is that voters go to the polls.

    At the current primary election rate, Romney would capture the nomination in June unless Santorum or Gingrich wins decisively in the coming contests. Including Puerto Rico's results, Romney has now collected 521 delegates, compared to Santorum's 253, Gingrich's 136 and Paul's 50, according to an Associated Press tally.

    Romney and a growing number of Republicans across the country are eager to move beyond the increasingly nasty primary season that has consumed far more energy, resources and political capital than most expected. But the former Massachusetts governor has so far struggled to win over his party's most passionate voters -- tea party activists and evangelicals who don't trust him as a true conservative.
     
    Romney's wife, Ann, had called for Republicans to unite behind her husband at a campaign stop the night before, suggesting it was time to "move on to the next challenge."
     
    Indeed, the battle for Illinois comes as Obama's campaign builds a mountain of campaign cash and organization in key states.
     
    Obama collected $45 million for his re-election bid in February, accelerating his fundraising pace as his campaign fretted over an oncoming spending blitz by Republican-leaning outside groups.
     
    With Republicans locked in their extended primary campaign, Obama's team is building a 50-state operation that aims to help register new voters, bring back past supporters and boost turnout. Obama's campaign had about $75 million in the bank through the end of January, but totals for February were not immediately available.
     
    Romney and Santorum, by comparison, raised $11.5 million and $9 million respectively in February. And Romney and his allies are spending large amounts in Illinois.
     
    Romney's campaign had spent $1.1 million, while the pro-Romney super PAC, Restore Our Future, had spent an additional $2.4 million on advertising in Illinois through Monday, according to figures collected by the media monitoring firm, SMG Delta. Santorum's super PAC, the Red White and Blue Fund, had spent $327,000, while his campaign had spent $200,000.
     
    Each side bought television ads that attacked the other. And though Romney focused on Obama Monday, he had spent much of the previous week calling Santorum "an economic lightweight," an indication that he continues to view Santorum as a threat.