US Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Twitter Over ISIS Rhetoric | NBC Chicago
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US Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Twitter Over ISIS Rhetoric

the widow of an American killed in Jordan said Twitter knowingly let the militant Islamist group use its network to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits

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    Twitter has maintained that a lawsuit, which was brought by the widow of an American killed in Jordan accusing the company of giving voice to ISIS, was without merit. Though the lawsuit was dismissed, representatives from the company said that "violent threats and the promotion of terrorism deserve no place on Twitter and, like other social networks, our rules make that clear."

    A federal judge ruled Wednesday to dismiss a lawsuit brought by the widow of an American killed in Jordan, which accused Twitter Inc. of giving voice to ISIS, NBC News reported.

    Tamara Fields, a Florida woman whose husband Lloyd died in an attack on the police training center in Amman last year, said Twitter knowingly let the militant Islamist group use its network to spread propaganda, raise money and attract recruits.

    U.S. District Judge William H. Orrick in San Francisco ruled that Twitter cannot be held liable for ISIS' rhetoric, but gave the plaintiff a chance to refile an amended lawsuit.

    While Orrick called the deaths "horrific," he agreed with Twitter and said federal law protects the company from liability for the content that third parties publish on its platform.

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