Revised GOP Health Care Bill Cuts Deficit Reduction in Half | NBC Chicago
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Revised GOP Health Care Bill Cuts Deficit Reduction in Half

The deficit reduction figures dropped mostly because the updated measure has additional tax breaks and makes Medicaid benefits more generous for some older and disabled people

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    Revised GOP Health Care Bill Cuts Deficit Reduction in Half
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    Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-WI) explains the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act during his weekly press conference at the U.S. Capitol March 9, 2017 in Washington, DC.

    Congress' nonpartisan budget analysts say changes Republican leaders have proposed in their health care bill to win House votes have cut the measure's deficit reduction by more than half.

    The Congressional Budget Office said Thursday that the new version would reduce federal shortfalls by $150 billion over the next decade. That's $186 billion less than the original bill.

    The deficit reduction figures dropped mostly because the updated measure has additional tax breaks and makes Medicaid benefits more generous for some older and disabled people.

    The office says the updated legislation would still result in 14 million additional uninsured people next year and 24 million more in a decade.

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    (Published Friday, June 23, 2017)

    Average premiums for people buying individual coverage would still rise over the next two years compared to current law, but then fall.