Paul Ryan Seeks to Re-Frame Election as Left Versus Right | NBC Chicago
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Paul Ryan Seeks to Re-Frame Election as Left Versus Right

Ryan said he'd focus all of his energies on electing Republicans down-ballot

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    In this May 12, 2016, file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. speaks with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, following his meeting with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

    House Speaker Paul Ryan tried again Friday to recast the presidential election as an ideological choice between a Republican-led congress that will fight for limited government and Hillary Clinton's "liberal progressive" agenda.  

    "Beneath all the ugliness lies a long-running debate between two governing philosophies: one that is in keeping with our nation's founding principles — like freedom and equality — and another that seeks to replace them," Ryan said in Madison, Wisconsin.

    Ryan said Republicans would seek to bring every federal regulation to congress for review and to simplify the tax code.

    He also called to repeal President Obama's signature health care law, which he said was part of Democrats' "liberal progressivism."   

    Trump Booed Leaving New York Times

    [NATL] Trump Booed Leaving New York Times
    President Elect Donald Trump is booed as he walks through the lobby of The New York Times Building after a 75-minute meeting with Times journalists. The lobby of the Times building is open to the public, and a large crowd had gathered by the time he departed. (Published Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016)

    “Liberal progressivism is not government for the people, it’s by them, the elites," he said. 

    The speech was yet another attempt by Ryan to refocus an election that's gone wildly off the rails as Trump this week lashed out at both Democrats and Republicans — even Ryan himself — for what he says is a conspiracy against him.

    Ryan did not mention the Republican nominee in his remarks.