DeVos' Delay in For-Profit College Rules Brings Lawsuit From 18 States and DC | NBC Chicago
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

DeVos' Delay in For-Profit College Rules Brings Lawsuit From 18 States and DC

The rules aim to make schools financially responsible for fraud and forbid them from forcing students to resolve complaints outside court

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    DeVos' Delay in For-Profit College Rules Brings Lawsuit From 18 States and DC
    AP Photo/Evan Vucci, FIle
    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos listens during a meeting between President Donald Trump and business leaders in the State Department Library of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Tuesday, April 11, 2017.

    Democratic attorneys general in 18 states and the District of Columbia are suing Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over her decision to suspend rules meant to protect students from abuses by for-profit colleges.

    The lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court in Washington and demands implementation of borrower defense to repayment rules.

    The rules aim to make schools financially responsible for fraud and forbid them from forcing students to resolve complaints outside court.

    They were created under President Barack Obama's administration and were to take effect July 1.

    Sean Spicer Resigns as WH Press Secretary

    [NATL] Spicer Resigns as WH Press Secretary; Sanders Takes Over

    President Donald Trump thanked White House press secretary Sean Spicer after Spicer announced his resignation on July 21, 2017 - six months after he started the position. Trump's statement was made through incoming press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

    (Published Friday, July 21, 2017)

    On June 14, DeVos announced the rules would be delayed and rewritten, saying they created "a muddled process that's unfair to students and schools."

    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey is leading the lawsuit and says DeVos' decision is "a betrayal of her office's responsibility and a violation of federal law."

    A statement from New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman lists the attorneys general involved: California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Iowa, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and the District of Columbia.