Boy Calls 911 Over Dad's Poor Dinner Choice

By Natalie Martinez
|  Thursday, Oct 21, 2010  |  Updated 2:29 PM CDT
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Police hope parents use incident as a reminder to stress to children the importance of using 911 properly.

Police hope parents use incident as a reminder to stress to children the importance of using 911 properly.

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A 10-year-old Buffalo Grove boy not happy with the noodle soup his father served him for dinner was so upset he called 911.

Last Thursday's call to the emergency number was preceded by a disagreement between father and son and ended with an officer at their door.

"He was misbehaving and I told him, 'Call them, let them come over here and see who is right,'" the unidentified father said, according to the released 911 recordings.

The son picked up the phone and called 911 but hung up when someone answered, authorities said.  The father answered when police called back.

"With these kids, they have to talk back and they have to have their attitude.  And they have to have my attitude in front of them because I'm the boss of the house.  They have to listen to us," the father said, according to the recording.  "He thinks it's just a joke, this 911.  I'm telling him that it's not a joke and we have to impose some rules."

The very-embarrassed boy soon realized he'd gone too far when Cpl. Anthony Goldstein arrived at the door of the family home. 

"He was eating [the soup] when I was there and he had his head down and he knew, he even said that he'd done wrong," Goldstein recalled.

Last November, Buffalo Grove police received a 911 hangup call, and when officers went to the home, a 15-year-old boy said that he had called because his parents had taken away his Xbox gaming system as a punishment.

"The young man was upset and asked if it was legal for his parents to take his stuff away," police Cmdr. Steve Husak said.  "The officers told him it was and that he should listen to his parents next time."

The incidents serve as a reminder to parents to stress the importance of using 911 services correctly.

"Parents can open this up as a tool to communicate and make sure that kids know that house rules are house rules and that unless it's very serious, in which the police need to come, whether it's physical violence or something else, but in other kinds of situations, that rules need to be followed in the home," said Husak.

No charges were filed.

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