Chicago Woman at Center of L.A. Firehouse Controversy

Delila Santos shot "Firehouse Burlesque Hula Hooping" at fire station which had truck appear in pornographic film earlier this year

View Comments ()
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    Delila Santos, a native of Logan Square, says the video she shot for Hoopnotica in a Venice fire station is completely innocent. Rob Elgas reports. (Published Wednesday, Dec 5, 2012)

    A Logan Square woman's aspirations of acting took her from the Chicago area to Los Angeles, but a video in which she recently appeared has a whole fire house under investigation.

    Delila Santos is a certified instructor in hooping, an exercise technique that's gaining popularity. The 21-year-old was doing what she loves on Venice Beach last month when she says someone from a California company called Hoopnotica approached her.

    "They brought me in to do just a fun, exercise hula hoop shoot. And I thought, 'Oh this will be great. It will be fun for me, great for you guys,'" she told NBC Chicago during a Wednesday phone call.

    Santos said she spent about 30 minutes shooting a video at a Venice fire station while firefighters cordially watched. Some even tried hooping.

    But therein lies a problem for the Los Angeles Fire Department: A few years ago one of the trucks from that same fire station -- Station 63 -- was used during the shooting of a pornographic video, NBC station KNBC reported Tuesday.

    Now the fire commissioner is answering questions about this latest video, titled "Firehouse Burlesque Hula Hooping" on YouTube.

    "It's currently under administrative investigation and I'm aware of it. My personal staff is aware of it and it's under investigation," said Commissioner Brian Cummings.

    But Santos, who goes by the moniker "Dizzy Delila," said she believes there's nothing wrong with the video.

    "The typical attire at Venice Beach is a T-shirt and shorts. I don’t see that anything I was wearing was out of line," she said "It’s for exercise and fun. So for it to be anything, seen as anything other than that is, in my opinion, just completely out of line and kind of wrong."

    During a two hour appearance before the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday, Cummings defended the station that served as the backdrop for the video.