Potential Evidence Found in Mobster's Home

Guns, cash, audio recordings found stashed behind photo frame

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Nearly $750,000 cash, loaded guns, jewelry and audio recordings have been found in the Oak Brook home of convicted Chicago mobster Frank Calabrese Sr, authorities said Wednesday.

    Among the items found stashed in a hole in a basement wall and hidden by a family portrait were recording devices and more than a dozen microcassettes, some with recordings on them.  The evidence suggests that Calabrese Sr. secretly recorded his mob confederates, court documents say.

    "If some prominent Outfit guys are on these tapes talking to Frank Calabrese about Outfit business, then that's a real trump card for the federal government then if they want to go in and indict," said John Binder, the author of The Chicago Outfit.

    Authorities said they believe that the seven firearms they found were used in criminal activity because they were wrapped in cloth
    to prevent fingerprints from being left behind.

    [PDF: Calabrese Search Warrant]

    The documents might prove that Calabrese and his wife attempted to launder illegal assets to avoid paying court-ordered restitution, according to the document. Deeds and other documents evidencing the transfer of property were found in a bankers' box and a plastic bin in the home's garage.

    The 71-year-old Calabrese Sr. was found responsible for more than a dozen mob murders as a result of being secretly recorded himself as part of the landmark Operation Family Secrets case

    His son, Frank Calabrese Jr., recorded his father in prison talking about the mob murders he committed, and Calabrese Sr.’s brother, Nick, testified against him at trial, describing the murders they did together.

    Calabrese Sr. is being held under the strictest security at a federal prison in Missouri.  His wife, Diane, and their two sons live in the home, the Chicago Tribune reported.  Diane Calabrese did not return a phone call for comment Wednesday.

    Calabrese Sr. "hasn’t lived there since the 1990s," said Calabrese’s attorney, Joseph Lopez. "I don’t know whose stuff it is."