Former NFL Player Accused of Posting Lewd Photos of Ex-Wife

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    AFP/Getty Images
    (file photo)

    A former NFL player’s ex-wife is suing him, alleging that his actions resulted in sexually explicit photos and videos of her being posted to several pornographic websites without her consent or knowledge.

    The ex-wife of Jeffrey Roehl filed the suit in Cook County Circuit Court Tuesday. Her name was not disclosed.

    She claims that at some point after the two divorced in 2006, sexually explicit photos and videos of her were distributed to different pornographic websites. The suit goes on to say that Roehl posted defamatory statements about his ex-wife in the comments sections of the sites.

    “[Roehl’s] conduct has caused the worldwide distribution of naked pictures of Plaintiff and videos of Plaintiff engaged in sexual acts,” the suit stated. “[Roehl] published numerous false statements on various websites ... accusing Plaintiff of adultery and fornication.”

    The suit stated that Roehl created a post on the “revenge porn site” MyEx.com that identified his ex-wife by name and contained about 50 sexually explicit photos of her.

    Roehl played for the New York Giants during the 2003 season, according to the NFL and the plaintiff’s attorney. He played high school football at Carl Sandburg High School in Orland Park and college football at the University of Notre Dame and then Northwestern University.

    His brother was named as a respondent-in-discovery because he “has information essential to the determination of who should properly be named as additional defendants,” the suit stated.

    Roehl did not respond to phone calls requesting comment and his spokeswoman did not comment on his behalf when reached Tuesday night.

    The five-count suit alleges defamation per se, intentional infliction of emotional distress, false light invasion of privacy, public disclosure of private facts and intrusion upon seclusion. She is seeking in excess of $150,000 in damages.